Presentation

 Life-long Community Presentations:
 


A "Magi-Kel" - "Magi-Chun" - Kelvin Chun is an award winning educator, magician, balloon sculptor and kite enthusiast from Honolulu, Hawaii. He is best known for his educational technology and mathematics teacher background, stage magic, inventive balloon sculptures and kites.

Chun, a member since 1995 in Ring 185 (Hawaii Magic Society), is currently the Hawaii Territorial Vice President of the International Brotherhood of Magicians.

He currently is a Board of Director for the Hawaii USA Federal Credit Union.

https://sites.google.com/site/kelvinchunmagikc/m
https://www.facebook.com/kelvin.chun.37/about

Kelvin Chun, a retired technology specialist and librarian at Nu'uanu Elementary School, has been named one of three Ed Tech Leaders of the Year by Technology & Learning magazine, a trade publication.

His national and international prestigious awards include being recognized by the Disney American Teacher Award, All USA Today 2000 First Teacher Team, George Lucas Educational Foundation, Ed Tech Leaders of the Year, Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Participant, International Brotherhood of Magicians, and Society of American Magicians.

In Hawaii, his awards include the Honolulu District Y2K Teacher of the Year and Moanalua High School's 2016 Kina'ole Honoree.


Kelvin has performed and presented at numerous conventions and conferences and provided staff development workshops and courses in the field of mathematics, magic, balloons, kites, and emerging technologies and their impact on learning at all ages.

As a teacher, consultant, lecturer and entertainer, Kelvin has spent over thirty years teaching and entertaining children, adults and educators, the topics of mathematics, technology, mathemagic and kites in the classroom. He has integrated STEM and the curriculum standards of mathematics, science, social studies, and performing arts; and woven his hobbies of technology, magic, kites and balloons, to design innovative technology, mathemagic and kite workshops. Kelvin has taught elementary and secondary education from K through adult. He shared his knowledge with students, educators, and entertainers at professional development workshops, courses, and conferences.

Kelvin has performed magic and balloons internationally for all ages. He has also competed against and performed with world class magicians in prestigious international magic competitions at venues such as Reno's Grand Sierra Resort 1,800-seat showroom, featuring the world's biggest stage. Kelvin is best known for his educational technology background, mathematical teaching capabilities, Asian stage magic, inventive cartoon balloon sculptures and traditional Asian kites.


Kelvin Chun, a retired award winning educator and magician, will inform the audience on identifying and understanding the essential components of a fulfilling and meaningful retirement through life-long activities such as learning, exercising, volunteering, traveling, performing magic and balloon art, and creating and flying kites.This can be an excellent time to try new things and experiment with passions you may have felt years ago. You have time on your hands, and you are planning your future years. Use technology and a world of ideas to think outside of the box and do what you want.
 
 


 
After working 30 or more years, retirement will offer a new challenge to stay active and engaged in a world that you now must manage.

 

Career Day Presentation
I-Portfolio
 
Ikigai Portfolio
 

“Paying forward the Magic Knowledge to New Generations in Paradise”



Kelvin Chun, an S.A.M. member since 2001, is an award winning teacher, magician, balloon artist and kite enthusiast. Chun was a 2005 I.B.M. Gold Medal Finalist, a 2005 Society of American Magicians (S.A.M.) Close-Up Finalist and a Kina‘ole honoree based on his professional accomplishments and community leadership. The concept of kina‘ole is best described as “flawlessness” and this award honors one who has done the right thing, at the right time, for the right reason – the first time.





Caption 1: Kelvin Chun honored the Kina’ole award in center.


Magic in Hawaii began in the 1940’s. The first organized meeting was documented in “The Kahuna” in 1949. Tenkai was a "guest" of the US government during WWII, and was interned in Hawaii. Local magicians Bill Murata and Jimmy Yoshida visited Tenkai frequently. These magicians bridged eastern and western magic and shared their knowledge with the magic community.


Paying forward the magic knowledge learned from mentors to the younger generations (X, Y, Z, Millennial and Post-Millennial) is a mission Kelvin Chun has pursued in his life-long career as an educator. His mentors were Hawaii’s famous magic dealers Jimmy Yoshida and Jimmy Zukemura.


Caption 2: Left picture: Jimmy Yoshida; Right picture: Jimmy Zukemura


Chun’s educational program became recognized internationally by George Lucas Educational Foundation’s Edutopia, Disney American Teacher Awards, All USA Today 2000 First Teacher Team, and the Honolulu District Y2K Teacher of the Year.


As a teacher, consultant, lecturer and entertainer, Chun has spent over thirty years teaching and entertaining children, adults and educators, the topics of mathematics, technology, mathemagic and kites in the classroom. He has integrated and woven his hobbies into STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math education), instructional design, and curriculum standards of mathematics, science, social studies, and performing arts.


Chun shared his knowledge to educators and magicians at professional development workshops, courses, and conferences. He believes magic can be a successful career for the future generation and shares his global knowledge to students during Career Days.


Caption 3: Chun get students involved in interactive magic during Career Day.


Caption 4: Chun shares career focus chart.


"I try to incorporate my experiences of the real world with the learning concepts." "Children are amazed by magic. That’s the mathemagic!” They incorporate a lot of hidden concepts.


As well as teaching students from kindergarten to twelfth grade mathematics and technology to succeed in today's high-tech world, it's not uncommon for Chun to mesmerize them with tricks that teach concepts such as geometry and symmetry. He also presented “Mathemagic” at the local and national Council of Teachers of Mathematics conventions.
 



Students call their technology teacher "Mr. Magic Man." Chun has worked magic with the school multimedia technology, but he's also the real thing: a nationally award-winning magician complete with a tux, suit, Aloha shirt, doves, parrots and rabbit.





Chun performs magic locally, nationally and internationally while making friends around the world!


Caption 5: Chun produces a parrot.


Chun traveled to Shangri-La to perform magic for the ethnic minorities – Tibetan community. Shangri-La is a paradise described from James Hilton’s 1933 fictional novel.


Shangri-La was renamed from Shambhala, a mythical kingdom hidden in inner Asia and is a pure land where reality is visionary or spiritual as much as physical or geographic.


Caption 6 Chun at Yading Nature Reserve - Shangri-La


Chun embarked on a journey that began in Yunnan, China and headed north near Tibet and explored areas in Sichuan provinces.


This area is known as the Tibet Autonomous Region is located on the
Tibetan Plateau, the highest region on earth. In northern Tibet elevations reach an average of over 4,572 metres (15,000 ft).


Chun trekked for 8 hours to Yubeng Village which is situated at the foot of the Meili Snow Mountain Range. Legend has it that for centuries Yubeng Village was unknown to the outside world. The only way to reach the village is by foot, donkey, or motorcycle.


He then rode a bus for 8 hours over rocky roads to reach the Yading Nature Reserve in the Kham region of Sichuan.


Caption 7 - Chun sharing magic at Yading Village


The exploration continued by 4 wheel drive over broken roads for 8 hours observing the destruction of the 2008 Great 8.0 Sichuan earthquake in Wenchuan County, Sichuan. Official figures stated that 69,197 were confirmed dead, and 374,176 injured, with 18,222 listed as missing. The destination was Mount Siguniang literally "Four Sisters Mountain" which is located in the bordering area of Rilong Town in Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province.





Caption 8 - Chun performs at Tibetan Wedding in Mount Siguniang.


Chun left China to visit magic friends in Tokyo, Japan.





"I shared the art of magic and how career opportunities can be created " Chun explained. An example is Tokyo’s award winning magician Yu Sekine, who performed at the 2007 Dallas S.A.M. convention. He studied in Nevada and returned to Japan as a consultant for a software firm then worked long corporate hours but found his true passion in magic. He decided to change careers and apply his marketing and performing arts knowledge to Roppongi’s Osmand MAHOU Dining Bar. The target market focused on entertaining magic to corporate clients. Sekine had integrated his vocation, passion, profession and mission in life. This Japanese concept is “ikigai” meaning "a reason for being.” Everyone has an ikigai. Finding it requires a deep and often lengthy search of self. That discovery of one's ikigai brings
satisfaction and meaning to life.


Caption 9: Left to Right: Kelvin Chun, Yu Sekine, and David Letendre in Roppongi’s Osmand MAHOU Dining Bar.


At the Roppongi Magic Bar (Osmond), he was humbled when 2006 FISM magician (Yasuhiko Okai) performed the thumb tie through a samurai sword.


Okai mentioned this trick was prepared special because he seen Chun in Shinjuku, Tokyo, 2001 S.A.M. convention competition when he was fourteen years old.


Caption 10: Okai and Katie performing thumb tie through a samurai sword.


Chun enjoys retirement by constantly learning, exercising, performing magic, traveling, volunteering as a Board of Director for the Hawaii USA Federal Credit Union, and networking with the future generation. Chun learned the Tibetan expression - Tashi delek, similar to Aloha! We invite you all to our magical paradise in Hawaii!

 

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This session will feature innovative ideas, hands-on activities, audience participation, and a magical performance.  Chun has requested that teachers bring to the meeting the following items:  a deck of playing cards, scissors string (about five feet), calculator (cell phones have them), paper, and marker.

Art of Magic, & Balloons

by Kelvin Chun

Magic, & Balloons

This session will focus on utilizing a variety of teaching and learning strategies in integrating across the curriculum utilizing magic and balloons and other activities as the vehicles to support the classroom teachers' program


http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/teacher_feature/teacher_feature079.shtml


What does magic have to do with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math? Everything! Magic tricks aren’t fooling the laws of nature, they’re only fooling our brains. Best of all, they can incorporate everything from surprising chemical reactions, mathematical patterns, and counter-intuitive physics to “gimmicked” magician’s props and the psychology of misdirection.

http://gettingsmart.com/2014/01/8-resources-teaching-stem-magic/

https://stemagicwi.wikispaces.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCTZHTEsOlw

http://www.magicismedicine.org/

http://projectmagic.org/

http://www.magictherapy.com/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v0cMptQThB4


Objective:

This session will enable teachers to:

1. explore a variety of applications which can be used to help deliver

and/or support instruction,

2. design activities which uses magic and balloons and other

instructional medium to deliver and/or support instruction.


Standards

A variety of standards can be applied. Visit the various state standards. Here are teacher resources.


Pick a number between 5 & 15:
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Pick a number from 1 through 12:



Types of Magic

Close - Up

Mentalism

Parlor

Stage

Illusion

Interactive

Foreign


ThinkQuest Magic

History


Tools

Engineers' tools: Math, science, and computers.

Actors' tools: Dress, play script, and stage props.

Chefs' tools: Food, spices, oven, and kitchen utensils

Singers' tools: Song and music.


Magicians' tools:

Cards, Money, Rope, Silk & Handkerchief, Sponge balls, Numbers & Math, etc.

 

Props (big & small)

 

Sleight of Hand


Magic Rules:

Never explain how a trick is done

Never explain what you are going to do ahead of time

Never repeat a trick for the same spectators

Practice each trick before you present it

Real Magic


Mathemagic Examples

 

Interactive Magic (ex. flags)

Online Magic

Mind Reader ... an animal?

Google

Pick a card

Lessons: 1, 2, 3


Optical Illusions

Geometric Vanishes

Extra Square

Get off the Earth

Rubber Geometry

Patterns / Symmetry / Tessellations

Exploratorium

Stare at the spinning wheel

 


Performance: Secret Number

1.Write a 3-digit number with all different digits

2.Reverse the digits and subtract the smaller from the larger

3.Reverse the result and add them up

4.Answer should be secret number


Tear 3 pieces of paper and draw a circle on the first piece, a square on the 2nd piece,

and a triangle on the 3rd piece.

Number each piece 1, 2 and 3 respectively by placing the

"1" in the circle

"2" in the square

"3" in the triangle

1) Circle, 2) Square, 3) Triangle

Opposite side write :

"4" on the back of the circle

"5" on back of the square

"6" on back of the triangle

Arrange the paper with 4, 5, 6 side up ...

mix them up to form any 3-digit number: 456, 654, 564,645, etc.

Take center paper and

turn it over ...

add up the 3 numbers ....

you have come up with a

number between 1 & 15


Think of a 2 digit number between 1 & 50

Both digits are odd

Both digits are different

Sum of digits greater than 9


Performance: Four-Ace Trick

1.Before trick, put 4 aces in positions 9, 10, 11, and 12 in deck.

2.Have subject pick a number between 10 and 20.

3.Deal that many off the deck.

4.Add digits of that number and put that many back on top of deck.

5.Take top card and set aside.

6.Repeat until you have four cards out of the deck.

7.These four cards will be the aces.


Performance: Success

1. Before trick, prepare 4 cards faced up as follows:

Card 1(bottom and facing up): Teacher; Card 2: Success; Card 3: Collaboration; Card 4 (top and facing up): Learning.

2. Have subject flip the top "Learning" card.

3. Cut the deck.

4. Flip the top 2 cards.

5. Cut the deck.

6. Turn over all cards.

7. Flip the top 2 cards.

8. Cut the deck.

(May repeat steps 7 & 8)

9. Flip the top card.

10. Flip the top 2 cards as one.

11. Flip the top 3 cards as one.

12. You will note that 3 cards are faced one way and only one card is faced the other. Check the other participants, and it should be a "success!"


Performance: A Magician Kelvin Chun:

1.Have someone cut the deck approximately in half.

2.Pick up either half and count the number of cards.

3.Add the digits, and counting from the bottom, go to that card number.

Have subject remember the card.

4.Replace that 1/2 deck on top of the other half deck.

5.Spell out A M A G I C I A N K E L V I N C H U N

(or any other 19 letter phrase or word)


Paper Magic:

Take paper and fill in the following letters:

Fold in 1/2

Fold in 1/2 again => 2 more times

You should have 8 separate rectangles

Trim off the edges of folded paper

Sort paper with face up and face down letters

Choose either one

Study letters and try to form a word with all the letters

If you can't make up a word, then choose other stack.

Secret Word?


Performance: Professor's NightMare

Performer shows three separate pieces of rope each of a different size.

There is a very short piece, a medium size piece, and a long piece. The

performer folds the three pieces and when the ropes are opened out again,

all three pieces are seen to be of the same size. A perfect illusion. If

required, the ropes can again be restored to their original different

sizes and tossed out for examination.


Preparing to do Magic

Gain Experience: Junior - Adult

Data, Information, Performing Arts

Books, video, internet, magic store

Magician is not only buying of illusions or props

Close up builds technical skills

Like movie reviews - evaluate shows and review

Choose a magician's style you like

Gain Knowledge: Friends - Meetings - Clubs - Conventions

Practice Performing:

For fun: Friends, family, clubs, groups of people, church, talent shows, contests, etc.

Paid: Restaurants, Parties, Stage Events, Conventions, etc.

Compete:

Local junior and senior competitions

Regional: PCAM, TAOM, MagiFest, SEAM, Abbots

National: SAM, IBM

International: Japan Cup / SAM, Hong Kong SAM, Asian, FISM

Performing for Contest

Must consider visual and audio presentation.

Is the props big enough?

Shall the audio be music or "talk."

Types of Stage: Manipulation, Comedy, Talk, Illusion, Music, Theme

Types of Close-Up: Parlor or Micro

Consider the judges preference or "people's choice"

Is the act original or a repeated trick?

Routine type: Cards, birds, cups/balls?

Preparing to Travel:

Is act portable? 50 lbs limit on 2 luggages

If bringing animals, consider quarantine and health certificate from veternarian.

If act is a fire act, must get supplies at destination.

Audio: Type of medium: Cassette, cd, or mini-disc

Always bring back-up

Time-limit: Finish on time. Contest time vary from 7-10 minutes.

Arrive at location early for technical meeting and final rehearsal. Provide time for set-up and bring enough supplies to do repeated performances.

Consider the order of performance.

Don't change routine at last minute.

Add variety to magic ... must make sense and not random acts

Focus on act

Regional magic

Don't acknowledge mistakes ... keep going ...ex. Olympic gymnast

Always accept critiques with thank you.

 

 

 


Math & Balloons

Statistics & Probability

Estimate the total number of balloons in bag

Estimate the probability of a color

Probability = Actual Number / Total Number


Yellow

Orange

Pink

L Blue

White

Black

Red

Green

D Blue

Purple

Total

P1

11

10

8

12

11

9

8

14

6

11

100

P2

8

10

12

12

9

9

12

11

6

11

100

Average?













Line Segment:

Definition?

Estimate/Measure:

Draw

Cut String

Unblown balloon

Blown balloon


Steps:

Inflate

 

Twist Types:

 

Connect

 

Pinch

 

Hook

 

Fold

 

Poodle tail

 

Ear

 

Create Bubble


Geometry/Art

Angles: Acute, Right, Obtuse

Shapes

Air Pressure: How many bubbles can be twisted ... maximum? Estimate!

Create Shapes!

Geometric Shapes:

Triangle

Square

Circle

Create objects with symmetry.

Animal figures

Concepts:

Estimation, probability, measurement, line segment, angles, surface tension, air pressure, symmetry, patterns, and shapes

Skills:

Problem Solving

Collaboration


School to Work Skills:

Basic: Communication- Read, Write, Math, Listening, and Speaking

Thinking: Creative, Decision Making, Problem Solving, etc.

Personal Qualities


Supplies

Resources:

Balloon Sites

kchun

Books & Articles


Preparing for Magic Contests

by Kelvin Chun

This session will focus on utilizing a variety of strategies to preparing for contests.


Types of Magic

Close - Up

Mentalism

Parlor

Stage

Illusion

 

Foreign

Quick Costume Change

 


Tools

Engineers' tools: Math, science, and computers.

Actors' tools: Dress, play script, and stage props.

Chefs' tools: Food, spices, oven, and kitchen utensils

Singers' tools: Song and music.


Magicians' tools:

Cards, Money, Rope, Silk & Handkerchief, Sponge balls, Numbers & Math, etc.

 

Props (big & small)

 

Sleight of Hand


Preparing to do Magic

Gain Experience: Junior - Adult

Data, Information, Performing Arts

Books, video, internet, magic store

Magician is not only buying of illusions or props

Close up builds technical skills

Like movie reviews - evaluate shows and review

Choose a magician's style you like

Gain Knowledge: Friends - Meetings - Clubs - Conventions

Practice Performing:

For fun: Friends, family, clubs, groups of people, church, talent shows, contests, etc.

Paid: Restaurants, Parties, Stage Events, Conventions, etc.

Compete:

Local junior and senior competitions

Regional: PCAM, TAOM, MagiFest, SEAM, Abbots

National: SAM, IBM

International: Japan Cup / SAM, Hong Kong SAM, Asian, FISM


Performing for Contest

Must consider visual and audio presentation.

Original magic?

Remember that audience are magicians

Is the props big enough?

Shall the audio be music or "talk."

Types of Stage: Manipulation, Comedy, Talk, Illusion, Music, Theme

Types of Close-Up: Parlor or Micro

Consider the judges preference or "people's choice"

Is the act original or a repeated trick?

Routine type: Cards, birds, cups/balls?

Preparing to Travel:

Is act portable? 50 lbs limit on 2 luggages

If bringing animals, consider quarantine and health certificate from veternarian.

If act is a fire act, must get supplies at destination.

Audio: Type of medium: Cassette, cd, or mini-disc

Always bring back-up

Time-limit: Finish on time. Contest time vary from 7-10 minutes.


Arrive at location early for technical meeting and final rehearsal.

Pre-Contest Meeting is essential to review the rules, scoring system, obtain order of performing and other issues.

Music & microphones: 2 copies of music on cassette tape or cd with label of full name.

Prepare an act sheet:

Description of Magic/Effects/ Songs

If need microphone, let them know.

Lighting:Technical people will be at meeting

Judges will be aware of lighting conditions

Bring everything you need for act -

tables, etc. (Close-up contest provide draped table)

Penalties for exceeding time limits:

SAM - 10 minutes (overtime: -1 pt for 5 seconds)

Disqualify after 15 minutes

(Close-up- judges in 1 room) Prepare to perform multiple times in different rooms


IBM Close-Up

Each contestant is allowed two (2) minutes to set up the equipment necessary for their performance.

An announcer in each of the Close-up performance rooms will announce only the contestant's name and city of residence.

No "build-up" is permitted. This announcement will initiate the beginning of the performance, and the timing of the performance will begin immediately following the introduction of the contestant.

The time limit for the performance is eight (8) minutes. Each contestant is allowed one (1) minute to strike (remove equipment) at the completion of their performance. Points will be deducted if the time limit is exceeded.


IBM - Stage: There must be at least three (3) contestants in each category in order for an award to be given in that category.


Pyrotechnic devices: Any fire/smoke devices must be limited. Some places must pay for permit.

Lots of waiting time

Awards: Regional/National: Trophy /money/ trip

Provide time for set-up and bring enough supplies to do repeated performances.

Consider the order of performance.

Don't change routine at last minute.

Add variety to magic ... must make sense and not random acts

Focus on act

Regional magic

Don't acknowledge mistakes ... keep going ...ex. Olympic gymnast

Always accept critiques with thank you.


SAM Judging:

Magical Nature: 0 - 10 pts.

Presentation: 0 - 10 pts. routining of act and professional manner of its delivery

Skill/Technique: 0 - 10 pts. Level of difficulty

Audience Appreciation: 0 - 10 pts. How entertaining

Presence: 0 - 5 pts. image/charisma projected

Originality: 0 - 5 pts. routining and the effects

Award of Honor: Gold: 90% of max score

 

 
 

Magic Presentation

MatheMagic


Types of Magic

Close - Up

Mental

Parlor

Stage

Illusion


Tools

Engineers' tools: Math, science, and computers.

Actors' tools: Dress, play script, and stage props.

Chefs' tools: Food, spices, oven, and kitchen utensils

Singers' tools: Song and music.

Magicians' tools:

 

Cards, Money, Rope, Silk & Handkerchief, Sponge balls, Numbers & Math, etc.

Props (big & small)

Sleight of Hand


Mathemagic Examples

 

Pick a card

Math in Magic & Balloons

Presentation1

Presentation2

Presentation 3

 


MathAMagic

Math Magic in Elementary

Mathematical Recreations - Advance

Mathemagician

Learn Magic Tricks


Optical Illusions

Exploratorium


Magic Squares

Flexagons

Flexagons2

Hexahexaflexagons

Math Games

Math Puzzles

Scott Kim inversions and puzzles


Magic Eye

Stereogram


Math Forum

Magic Sites

Kelvin's Magic Site


Balloon Site


by Krystn Palmer (jkplmr@phonetech.com)

Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, Michigan

Materials Required: Paper and pencil

Activity Time: 5 - 10 minutes

Concepts Taught: Subtraction/regrouping

 

"Math Magic" is a wonderful activity to use with students when you find

that you have some time to fill!

 

Ask students to select a three-digit number. However, stress to students

that the first and last digits of the number CANNOT be the same (ex.

121, 474, etc.). Once the students have selected their numbers, have

them invert the number. For instance, 123 would become 321. Have

students subtract the smaller number from the larger of the two, keeping

their answer a "secret" from you.

 

Next, ask a student to give you either the first or the last digit of

their answer. You then "guess" their whole answer! How does it work? The

center digit will ALWAYS be "9". The sum of the first and last digits

will ALWAYS be "9". So, if a student gives you his first number as "2",

you instantly know that the answer is 297!! If, however, a student gives

you the last number of their answer and it is "9", then you know that

their answer is only 99.

 

ENJOY! The students love this one, and marvel that their teacher is

"psychic"! Once they learn the secret, they love to try it out on all of

their family and friends!!


Notes

Performance: Predicting a Number

1.Write down the year of your birth.

2.Write down the year when something interesting happened and add the two

years together.

3.Add to this sum your age this year.

4.Add to this sum the number of years since the interesting event

happened.

5.Sum will always be twice the current year.

 

Performance: The Missing Eight

1.Write down 12345679

2.Ask someone which of the digits in the number s/he likes the least and

have the person put an "x" over the digit selected.

3.Ask the person to multiply 12345679 by a number you select.

4.All of the digits in this product will match the number marked with the

"x."

 

Performance: Predicting the Remainder

1.Write a 3-digit number

2.Add the 3 digits until you get a single digit.

3.Have volunteer divide the 3-digit number by 9

4.Remainder should be number (unless the single digit is 9, remainder is

0)

 

Performance: Secret Number

1.Write a 3-digit number with all different digits

2.Reverse the digits and subtract the smaller from the larger

3.Reverse the result and add them up

4.Answer should be secret number


Balloons

1.Probability

2.Angles

3.Air Pressure - How many bubbles can be twisted ... maximum? Estimate!

4.Create Shapes


Performance: The Lightning Calculator 1.Choose a volunteer and ask her/him

to write down a 5-digit number. 2.You write down a number under her/his

number. 3.Continue in this manner, alternating numbers, until the column

is at least 8 figures long. 4.Have the volunteer find the sum of these

numbers.

5.While s/he is summing the column of figures, you write down the sum as

fast as you can write the digits.

Performance: Foretelling a Sum

1.Choose a volunteer and have her/him write down any two numbers and

announce what they are.

2.Have the volunteer find the sum of these two numbers, write it down, and

announce the sum.

3.Have the volunteer find the sum of the second and third numbers, write

that down, and announce the sum.

4.Give the same instructions for the third and fourth numbers.

5.Instruct the volunteer to continue the pattern until ten numbers are

listed.

6.After the seventh number is listed, announce: I predict that the sum of

these numbers will be ___.

7.Have the volunteer compute the sum of the ten numbers.

 

Performance: Foretelling a Sum

1.Write down any 2 numbers.

2.Find the sum of these numbers and write it down.

3.Find the sum of the last two numbers (the second number and the sum) and write it down.

4.Continue adding the last two numbers written until ten numbers are

listed.

5.The sum of the ten numbers can be predicted from the seventh number in

the list.

 

Performance: Unveiling Even and Odd

1.The first person chooses either 9 or 10 and multiplies it by 2.

2.The second person takes the other number and multiplies it by 3.

3.They compute the sum of the two products.

4.From this sum, you can determine which person chose 9 and which person

chose 10.

Performance: Predicting the Hour

1.Have your subject think of any number on the dial of a clock.

2.Tell the person to silently add one to the number s/he selected each

time you point to a number on the clock dial, until s/he gets to 20. Have

the person announce aloud when s/he reaches 20.

3.Point to 7 randomly selected numbers on the dial, then point to the 12

and continue pointing counterclockwise until 20 is announced.

4.When 20 is announced, you will be pointing to the number the person

selected.

 

Performance: Amazing Prognostication

1.Write a prediction (any number between 1 and 50) on a piece of paper and

fold it.

2.Give the paper to someone to hold during the trick.

3.Ask a different person to choose any whole number between 50 and 100 and

say it aloud.

4.Ask the person who chose the number to perform the calculations below.

a.Add the 2-digit number __ to the number chosen.

b.Delete the leftmost digit from the sum.

c.Add the deleted digit to the remaining number.

d.Subtract this result from the number originally chosen and

announce the answer.

5.Ask the person holding the folded paper to read your prediction. The

two numbers will match.

 

Performance: Predictable Dice

1.Roll a pair of six-sided dice.

2.Find the following products:

(top of DIE #1) X (top of DIE #2)

(bottom of DIE #1) x (bottom of DIE #2)

(top of DIE # 1) x (bottom of DIE #2)

(top of DIE #2) x (bottom of DIE #1)

3.Find the sum of the products.

4.The sum of these four products can be predicted before the dice are

rolled.

 

Performance: Who Is Hiding the Coin?

1.Select a group of 2-9 people and assign an identification number to each

person.

2.When your back is turned, one person in the group hides a coin in

her/his left or right hand. Each person in the group should know where

the coin is.

3.Randomly choose someone in the group to perform the following

calculations:

a.Multiply the identify number of the person concealing the coin by 2.

b.Add 5 to this number.

c.Multiply the result by 5.

d.Add 10 to the result.

e.Now add 1 if the coin is in the person's right hand or 2 if the coin

is in her/his left hand and announce the result.

 

4.From this result, you identify who is holding the coin and which hand it

is in.

 

Performance: The Marble Transfer

1.Person A takes a handful of marbles from a bowl and counts them.

2.Person B takes 3 times as many marbles as A took.

3.Person A gives 5 marbles to person B.

4.Person B gives back to person A 3 times as many marbles as A is now

holding.

5.At this point, you can predict the number of marbles Person B is

holding.

6.When you know how many marbles person A has now, you can determine how

many marbles both A and B originally took.

 

Performance: The Money Mystery

1.Imagine a sum of money less than ten dollars.

2.Transpose the digits.

3.Take the difference between these two amounts.

4.Transpose the digits in the difference.

5.Add this transposition to the difference.

6.You can predict the final answer.

 

Performance: Permutation Prediction

1.Choose any number consisting of three consecutive ascending digits.

2.Determine all permutations (possible arrangements) of these digits and

list these six three-digit numbers.

3.Compute the sum of these numbers and divide the sum by 6.

4.From the quotient, the original number can be predicted.

 

 

 

 

 

Performance: Magical Number Nine

Variation 1

1.Select a three-digit number in which none of the three digits is the

same.

2.Form another three-digit number by rearranging the original digits.

3.Now subtract the two three-digit numbers and add the digits in this

difference.

4.From the first (or last) digit in the sum, you can tell the other digit.

Variation 2

1.Select a three-digit number in which none of the three digits is the

same.

2.Form another three-digit number by rearranging the original digits.

3.Now subtract the two three-digit numbers and add the digits in this

difference.

4.If the sum is not one digit, continue adding the digits in the result

until you reach a one digit number. You can predict this digit.

 

Performance: The Missing Digit

1.Choose a four-digit number and compute the sum of its digits.

2.Cross out any one of the digits in the original number, and write the

remaining three digits as a three-digit number.

3.From this three-digit number, subtract the sum of the digits previously

computed.

4.Sum the digits in this difference.

5.From this result, you can tell the digit that was crossed out in the

original number.

 

Performance: A Permutation Trick

1.Take 3 blank cards and write any single digit on the first card, any

single digit on the second card (please do not make both digits zeros),

and a decimal point on the third card.

2.Without revealing the numbers chosen, find all possible decimal numbers

that can be formed by rearranging the three cards. There should be six.

3.Sum the six numbers.

4.Multiply this sum by 100.

5.Divide this result by 11.

6.Divide this result by 3.

7.Finally, divide this result by the sum of the two digits that were first

selected.

8.You can predict the answer.

 

Performance: The Reappearing Number

1.Write down any two-digit prime number greater than 13.

2.Attach a zero to this number and form a six-digit number by repeating

these three digits.

3.Pass the paper to 5 other people. Have each of them do successive

divisions by the primes: 2, 5, 7, 11, and 13. The first person divides

the six-digit number by 2, the second person divides the resulting

quotient by 5, the third person divides the second quotient by 7, and so

on. In all the divisions, the remainders are zeros. When the final

division is completed, the last quotient is written on the paper and

passed back to the person who thought of the number.

4.When you get the paper back, you will recognize the two-digit prime

number on the paper.

Performance: Permutation Prediction

1.Think of a number.

2.Perform the computations:

a.Multiply the number by 2.

b.Add 6 to the product.

c.Add this result to the square of the original number.

d.Subtract 5 from this sum.

e.Take the square root of the difference.

3.Predict the original number selected.

 

Performance: Divining from a Table

1.Have someone think of a number from 1 to 60.

2.Give them the six cards.

Card 1: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29, 31, 33, 35,

37, 39, 41, 43, 45, 47, 49, 51, 53, 55, 57, 59

Card 2: 4, 5, 6, 7, 12, 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22, 23, 28, 29, 30, 31, 36,

37,

38, 39, 44, 45, 46, 47, 52, 53, 54, 55, 60, 13

Card 3:8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 40,

41,

42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 13

Card 4:2, 3, 6, 7, 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, 19, 22, 23, 26, 27, 30, 31, 34, 35,

38,

39, 42, 43, 46, 47, 50, 51, 54, 55, 58, 59

Card 5:16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 48,

49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 30, 60

Card 6:32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48,

49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 41

3.Ask for all the cards containing her/his number.

4.From the cards returned to you, you can predict her/his number.

Performance: The Domino Chain

1.Mix the 28-piece set of dominoes and place them face up on a table.

2.Ask your subject to form a single chain using all the dominoes and

matching them end to end as in normal play.

3.You can predict the beginning and ending numbers in the domino chain.

 

Performance: Sum Fun

1.Number 6 slips of paper from 1 to 6.

2.Arrange your pieces of paper like this:

3 1 2

4 6 5

 

Add pieces of paper which are adjacent to each other:

Solution: 4, 3, 10, 11, 7, 7, 7

 

3.Rearrange your slips of paper until all the answers are different from

each other- 7 different answers. Record your arrangement.

 

4.Rearrange your slips of paper so that you have only 3 different answers.

 

Performance: Was It a Rat I Saw (Palindrome)

1.Definition: reads the same from left to right and from right to left.

2.Examples: MOM, RADAR, ABBA, 747, 222, 54145, REDIVIDER

3.You can create your own Type I (1 addition step) or

Type 2 (2 addition step) as follows:

 

Reverse digits and add:

Type 1: 43 + 34 = 77

Type 2: 85 + 58 = 143

+341

--------

484

Show that 153 is Type 2 and 79 is Type 6.

Try 24 steps for 98 to get 8813200023188

 

Performance: 6174

1.Take any 4-digit number as long as the 4 digits are not all the same.

2.Using these 4 digits, make as big a number as possible.

3.Using these same 4 digits, make as small a number as possible.

4.Subtract the answer to step 3 from the answer to step 2.

5.Repeat steps 2-4 till you get the answer 6174. (Try 3 digits and see!)

Performance: Mental Math

1.Multiply by 11:

352458

111111

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

385 264638

(8 = 3 + 5)(6 = 2+4)?

 

Performance: 7/11

1.Write a number < 10

2.Write another number < 10

3.Add the first 2 numbers

4.Add the second and third numbers

5.Add the 3rd and 4th numbers

6.Continue this pattern until there are 10 numbers in the column.

7.Add up all numbers

(Short cut: Multiply the 7th number by 11)

Ex. 7, 2, 9, 11, 20, 31, 51, 82, 133, 215 = 561

(51 x 11 = 561)

Performance: Predicting the Remainder

1.Write a 3-digit number

2.Add the 3 digits until you get a single digit.

3.Have volunteer divide the 3-digit number by 9

4.Remainder should be 7 (unless the single digit is 9, remainder is 0)

 

Performance: Divining a Number

1.Write a number between 1 and 10 inclusive

2.Multiply by 3

3.Divide bye 2

4.If you note that a fraction remains, key 1

5.Multiply by 3 again, and divide by 2

6.If a fraction, key 2

7.Add 2

8.Subtract 11

9.If a subject cannot do that without getting a negative number, add key

numbers and that's the number they had.

10.If subject can do it, key 4

11.Add 5

12.Subtract 14

13.If cannot without negative number, add key numbers to get their number.

If can, total key numbers and add another 4.

 

 

Performance:Which Hand

1.Tell subject to put a dime in one hand, and a penny in the other without

you seeing which is which.

2.Tell subject to multiply the value of the coin in the right hand by any

even number you pick.

3.Tell subject to multiply the value of the coin in the left hand by any

odd number you pick.

4.Add the results and have them tell you if their sum is even or odd.

5.If even, penny is in the right hand and the dime in the left. If odd,

dime is in the right hand and the penny in the left.

 

Performance: Tapping the Hours:

1.Have the subject think of any number on the watch dial.

2.Tell them to start with their number and count to 20 as you tap. When

they reach twenty, they should say stop.

3.Tap 8 random numbers, 9th tap should be on 12 and then continue until

they say stop going counterclockwise on consecutive numbers.

4.When they say stop, it will be on their number.

 

Performance: Predicting a Number

1.Write down the year of your birth.

2.Write down the year when something interesting happened and add the two

years together.

3.Add to this sum your age this year.

4.Add to this sum the number of years since the interesting event

happened.

5.Sum will always be twice the current year.

 

Performance: Guessing the Total:

1.Have subject roll three dice. They should add the faces that are up.

2.Have them select on the die and add the number on the bottom face.

3.Roll that die again and add the new "up" face to the total

4.Make sure they leave dice as they now are and you can tell them their

total by adding the faces showing up plus 7.

 

Performance: Royal Pairs:

1.Before trick, remove kings and queens from deck. Separate kings into 1

pile and queens into another, but in the same suit order. Place one on

top of the other.

2.Allow someone to cut as many times as they want.

3.Split into two piles, 4 cards each, without disturbing the order.

4.Top of each deck will be a pair.

 

Performance: Four-Ace Trick

1.Before trick, put 4 aces in positions 9, 10, 11, and 12 in deck.

2.Have subject pick a number between 10 and 20.

3.Deal that many off the deck.

4.Add digits of that number and put that many back on top of deck.

5.Take top card and set aside.

6.Repeat until you have four cards out of the deck.

7.These four cards will be the aces.

 

Performance: The Magic of Manhattan:

1.Have someone cut the deck approximately in half.

2.Pick up either half and count the number of cards.

3.Add the digits, and counting from the bottom, go to that card number.

Have subject remember the card.

4.Replace that 1/2 deck on top of the other half deck.

5.Spell out T H E M A G I C O F M A N H A T T A N

(or any other 19 letter phrase or word)

6.Spelling ends on selected card.


Professor's Nightmare

K. Chun

Effect: Teacher shows three separate pieces of rope each of a different

size. There is a short piece, a medium size piece, and a long piece. The

teacher folds the three pieces and when the ropes are opened out again,

all three pieces are seen to be of the same size.

Modification: Have students measure and cut the ropes and the

rest of the class estimate the length.

Performance: Hold the three ropes in your left hand as illustrated in figure 1.

The shortest rope is to the left towards the joint of the thumb, then the

medium size rope and finally the long rope.

 

Grip the hanging end of the shortest rope with your right hand

from behind the other two ropes and bring it to the top placing it to the

extreme right of the three ends besides the original short end as in figure 2.

Take the hanging end of the middle sized rope and place it to the

right of the four ends in your hand. Finally take the hanging end of the

longest rope and place it to the extreme right. The position at this

stage is as in figure 3. Your extended fingers cover the fold of the

shortest rope from the students' view.

Separate the three ends to your right and pull out the ropes. Let

them hang down. All three ropes appear to be of the same size.

 

Performance: Professor's NightMare

Performer shows three separate pieces of rope each of a different size.

There is a very short piece, a medium size piece, and a long piece. The

performer folds the three pieces and when the ropes are opened out again,

all three pieces are seen to be of the same size. A perfect illusion. If

required, the ropes can again be restored to their original different

sizes and tossed out for examination.

 

Preparation:

Cut ropes / string as follows:

1/2 of small + 1/2 of long = 1 medium


Max Maven Notes:

3-Paper Experiment

Tear 3 pieces of paper and draw:

 

1) Circle, 2) Square, 3) Triangle

Write the "1" in the circle

"2" in the square

"3" in the triangle

 

Opposite side write :

"4" on the back of the circle

"5" on back of the square

"6" on back of the triangle

 

place paper with 4,5, 6 side up ... mix them up to form any 3-digit number: 456, 654, 564,645, etc.

Take center paper and

 

turn it over ...

 

add up the 3 numbers ....

you have come up with a number between 1 & 15

 

....

solution: 12

Astrology ...

 

a, b, c, d ...................

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

think of a number from 10 to 20 ... place your finger on a - 1, b- 2, c-

3, d-4, 10-5, 11-6, ... till you come to your

thought out number ....ex. 11 ....

12- 7, 1-8, 2-9, 3-10,4-11...

now you count your number again, but in the opposite direction ... counter

clockwise ...

start your count with the circle you finished on ... starting with 1 ...

ex. 4-1, 3-2, 2-3, 1-4, 12-5, 11-6, 10-7, 9-8, 8-9, 7-10, 6-11

now you have come o a sign .... which is the number 6 ......

 

Folded paper ...

Take a paper and fold in 1/2, fold in 1/2 2 more time ... into 8 separate

rectangles ... unfold the paper and fill information with: upper left

corner A ... B ... C .... D

H ... G ... F ... E

 

Take your paper and fold in any manner ... along long axis, or fold paper in on self ... fold in or outward to a

single unit ... take your scissors and trim off the edges of folded paper

... you will come out with separate rectangles ...

sort paper with face up and face down letters .... and choose either one

... study letters and try to form a word with all the letters ... if you

can't make up a word, then choose other stack ... you got a word ....

CAGE

 

interactive symbols ...matrix

arrow square cross

circle heart star

rectangle triangle diamond

place your finger on any design and spell out the design ...move finger

from space to space for each letter .. .you can move left/right, up and

down ... not diagonally ...

once a space is gone, you can't move there ...

now that you have finished spelling, you're not on the rectangle ... it's gone, you can't go there anymore

arrow square cross

circle heart star

triangle diamond

move 5 times ... you're not on circle

arrow square cross

heart star

triangle diamond

move 2 times ... you're not on triangle

arrow square cross

heart star

diamond

move 3 times ... take away arrow & diamond ...

square cross

heart star

move 3 times ... take away square

cross heart star

 

move 1 time ... get rid of heart & cross ...

 

star

 

you are the star!

 

Cards ...

1)

deal 2 stacks of 5 cards each ... left/right ...

look at card on top of left pile ... remember it

pick up right stack, and option ... you can deal cards away to deck that

was placed on side ... you can

determine to get rid of 1-4 cards ... the remaining card goes on top the

left stack and buries it away ....

your card is in the middle somewhere .... pick up pile and turn face up, mix the cards as follows ...

deal the top card to table, then the next card under the stack ... down

and under till you run out of cards ...

now the pile is mixed ... take the pile and face down on table and remove

the top card ... face down ... say the card you remember out loud ... not

that one ...

second card ... nope ...

third card ... ah ... yes ... that's it !

 

2) Shuffle cards ...

cut into 3 piles/ approx. equal ... choose only 1 pile and put the others

away ...

should have between 10-20 cards ... count them ... now the number is

random ....

add the 2 digits together .... whatever the total, deal that many cards to

discard ...

hold the cards and deal down for 2 groups ... you can put 1 to right and left or 2/2, or 3/3, or 4/4 ...

you now have 1 pile to left, 1 on right and maybe some in hand ... take

either of 2 piles and discard ...

look at bottom card of pile ... that's yours ... take the pile and place

on left hand ...

I'll find your card by spelling Max Maven or counting 8 ... and put the

cards to the bottom of the packet ....

the top card is yours!

 

3) 4 cards ... each suit ... take out any of each ....

S, H, D, C

Take spade and face up ... on it the heart, club, then diamond ... pick up

4 cards and place face up ... turn over diamond ... cut the packet ...

transfer from top to bottom, take top 2 cards and turn over as one, cut

the cards any way, turn the entire packet over and repeat procedure...

take top 2 cards and turn over as one, cut the cards any way

option ... you can do this again or not do it ... take top single card and turn over ..

take top 2 cards and turn over as one, take top 3 cards and turn over as

one, turn over entire packet .....

at this point, all mixed ... nevertheless, it could have a lot of

combinations, but only 1 is reverse ...

spread out packet ....

solution: heart!


Card Trick Notes:

Performance: Royal Pairs:

 

1.Before trick, remove kings and queens from deck. Separate kings into 1

pile and queens into another, but in the same suit order. Place one on

top of the other.

2.Allow someone to cut as many times as they want.

3.Split into two piles, 4 cards each, without disturbing the order.

4.Top of each deck will be a pair.

 

Performance: Four-Ace Trick

 

1.Before trick, put 4 aces in positions 9, 10, 11, and 12 in deck.

2.Have subject pick a number between 10 and 20.

3.Deal that many off the deck.

4.Add digits of that number and put that many back on top of deck.

5.Take top card and set aside.

6.Repeat until you have four cards out of the deck.

7.These four cards will be the aces.

 

Performance: The Surprise In Hawaii:

 

1.Have someone cut the deck approximately in half.

2.Pick up either half and count the number of cards.

3.Add the digits, and counting from the bottom, go to that card number.

Have subject remember the card.

4.Replace that 1/2 deck on top of the other half deck.

5.Spell out T H E S U R P R I S E I N H A W A I I

(or any other 19 letter phrase or word)

6.Spelling ends on selected card.

 

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