Board of Director - HIUSA FCU



 
 
 

 


EMPLOYMENT HISTORY: Hawaii Department of Education

1998 - 2014: Nu`uanu Elementary School: Technology Resource Teacher &  / Media Specialist.

1996 - 1998: Waialae Elementary School: Multimedia Learning Center Facilitator

1995 - 1996: Pohakea Elementary: Technology Resource Teacher. (High-need children)

1992 - 1995: Campbell Complex/Leeward District Office (11 Schools): Technology Resource Teacher.  (High-need children)

Assisted Campbell Complex and Leeward District schools with: general assessment of present and future technological needs.

1990 - 1991: General Education Branch, OIS: Computer Education Specialist II.

Planned, designed, and developed the state computer education program for all students, grades K-12. Identified pre-service and inservice training needs of teachers and coordinates with districts in designing training programs.

1991 - 1992: Waialua Intermediate & High School: Math Teacher.

1990 - 1992: Moanalua High School: Adult Education Computer Literacy Teacher.

1987 - 1990: Pearl City High: Computer Science and Math Teacher.

1984 - 1987: Waianae High School: Math Teacher - (High-need children).

1984 and Summers from 1984 - 1986: Moanalua High School: Math Teacher.

1983: McKinley High School: Math Teacher (Student Teacher).

1983:  Kaiser High School: Observation / Participation

1983: Maryknoll Elementary School: Observation / Participation

Summer, 1982: Department of Health, Research & Statistics: Health Surveillance: Volunteer Statistical Research Assistant

Fall, 1980: University of Hawaii, Central Accounting: Accounting Assistant

1975-1984: Dole Pineapple Cannery, Processing Department: Temperature Regulator & Inspector, Palletizer / Seamer Operator

 

University of Hawaii, Outreach College: Technology and Math Instructor:


Professional Development Teacher Trainer

1993 - Present: University of Hawaii, Outreach College: Technology and Math Instructor State/District Summer Institute. Taught 10 summers TECS, ETEC and EDCI courses through College of Continuing Education and the Department of Education. The courses covered topics in technology and mathematics.

Summers, 2000-2001: Nuuanu Elementary School, Technology Classes

Summers, 1998-99: Nuuanu Elementary School, Technology Classes

Summers, 1996-1997: Waialae Elementary School,Technology and Math Classes

Summer, 1996: Aliamanu Intermediate School, Math Classes

Summers, 1993-1995: Ewa Beach Elementary School, Technology Classes

Department of Education, "B" Credit Classes: Technology Instructor at:

Summer, 1999: Nuuanu Elementary School, TLCF: Hyperstudio Basics

Spring, 1997: Waialae Elementary School,Technology Classes

Summer, 1993: Ewa Beach Elementary School, Technology Classes


2016 - 2017 Distinguished Alumni - Moanalua High Kina'ole Honoree & UH Department of Learning Design & Technology

06/2006 Japan Fulbright Memorial Fund Teacher Program

12/2002 National Ed Tech Leaders of the Year - Technology Learning

10/2000 All USA Today First Teacher Team

08/1999 Disney American Teacher Award Honoree: Elementary Technology Specialist /  Hawaii Department of Education Honolulu District Teacher of the Year


1. Hawaii USA Federal Credit Union Volunteer

05/2014 - Present: Board of Director

02/2016-02/2017: Board of Director Vice Chair

02/2001 - Present: Committtee Volunteer:

Committees: Scholarship, Workforce, Strategic Planning, Technology, Golf, Annual Banquet, Personnel, Loan Policy and Review, Governance, and Asset-Liability

2. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) Educational Presenter & Facilitator

1991 - Present:

Hawaii Council of Teachers of Mathematics, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Hawaii Department of Education, Kamehameha School, Pacific Aviation Museum, Japan American Museum, Care Homes and University of Hawaii Outreach College

Workshop and Conference Presenter of Mathematics, Magic, Robotics, Multimedia, Technology, Balloons, Kites, Career, and Ikigai

3. Magician And Entertainer

1995 - Present:

International Brotherhood of Magicians, Society of American Magicians, Fellowship of Christian Magicians, Texas Association of Magicians, and Pacific Association of Magicians

Conference Presenter and Performer

4. 2014 - Present 

See Dai Doo Chinese Organization Director


1. Hawaii USA Federal Credit Union Volunteer:

2001 - Present: See above for volunteer roles

2. Course Certification

Hawaii Credit Union League and the Credit Union National Association, Inc.:

09/2016: Pakela Award for Educational Achievement

09/2015, 08/2017: CUNA (Credit Union National Association)

Volunteer Certification Program

Areas of Study:

- Safety and Soundness

- Governance

- CEO Oversight

- Board Operations and Development

- Strategic Planning

CUNA Volunteer Achievement Program

09/2015: Thomas Doig Certificate and Pin: 48 VAP courses completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03

09/2015: Strategic Planning Certification

09/2015: Governance Certification

09/2015: CEO Oversight Certification

09/2015: Board Operations & Development Certification

09/2015: Safety and Soundness Certification

09/2015: Regulatory Compliance Award

09/2015: Credit Committee Award

09/2015: Dora Maxwell Certificate and Pin: 42 VAP courses completed

09/2015: Louise Herring Certificate and Pin: 36 VAP courses completed

09/2015: Alphonse Desjardins Certificate and Pin: 30 VAP courses completed

09/2015: Roy F. Bergengren Certificate and Pin: 24 VAP courses completed

09/2015: Friedrich Raiffeisen Certificate and Pin: 18 VAP courses completed

09/2015: Credit Union Services Award

09/2015: Supervisory Committee Award

08/2015: Board of Directors Award

08/2015: Board Financial Literacy Certificate

08/2015: Credit Union Leadership Award

National Association of Federal Credit Union

06/2015, 07/2017: Certified Volunteer Expert Course

Certification: Governance

Certification: CEO Oversight

Certification: Board Operations and Development

Certification: Strategic Planning

3. Conferences, Workshops, and Courses

2014 - Current: Hawaii Credit Union League Convention, Directors and CEOS Leadership Convention, CUNA Conference, NAFCU Conference, CU Conference, and International Summit of the Cooperatives

06/2014: Accounting & Risk Seminar, Waialae Country Club/ Kwock & Company CPAs. 06/2014: Watchdog Mini Series #18: Strategic Planning,Waialae Country Club/ Kwock & Company CPAs 04/2008: Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3), Certiport.

03/1993: Facilitative Leadership, Interaction Associates Seminar

I would like to serve as a Board of Director to represent our members and promote the "Life Matters" concept, and be a visionary to strategically plan for the future. 

As a member of three credit unions for 60 years, I understand the role of contributing back to the community.


I will focus on Future Financial Technology and New Normals:

1. Applications of machine learning in financial services and regulation

2. Algorithms and Big Data emerging risk management perspectives

3. Artificial intelligence and Digital Identification Technologies and Combatting Fraud (Cybersecurity)

4.Automation and its impact on jobs in financial services


With the increasing popularity of digital banks and marketplace lenders, traditional banks and credit unions are encountering the folowing challenges:

1. Meeting the Digital Expectations of the Customers

2. For Credit: Digital is Not Enough

3. Dealing with Security Issues

4. Marketing Efforts

5. Training Employees

6. Relationship banking


I have volunteered since 2001 and have been a life long learner modeling the life matters philosophy.  My educational background and professional development allowed for advancement in certifications.

I will apply my financial and technical skills to represent the members' needs and prepare for the constantly changing environment.

 


  1. What do you know about HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union and why are you interested in serving as a Board of Director?

 

The candidate’s answer will help us understand how much the know about our credit union and if they even bothered to do their research which will show commitment.  The second part of the question will gauge their intentions of why they want to run (e.g. do they want to make a difference or do they just want us to have higher deposit rates).  Part 2 is also an existing question.

 




Started November 6, 1936 as Oahu Teachers No. 3 Federal Credit Union. 

138 members and assets of $4,499

Membership: Honolulu District elementary school teachers- 

Asset size $1.99 billion, and 131,000 members 

14 branch locations 

1971 Oahu Educational Employees Federal Credit Union.

Expanded membership  over 8600 Select Employee Groups (SEGs).

Department of Education 31,000 members

On February 23, 2000- HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union.

Credit unions are not-for-profit financial institutions, owned by their members. 


Cooperative

Members pool their money for the credit union to lend to other members. Profits earned are returned to members in the form of lower fees, higher dividends, and/or other benefits. Hence, the credit union motto, “People helping people.” 

Vision Statement:

HawaiiUSA will be recognized as the "Life matters" organization that makes financial dreams come true.

Mission Statement:

HawaiiUSA improves our members' lives through our "Life matters" commitment.


Vision and Excellence 


I would like to serve as a Board of Director to represent our members and promote the "Life Matters" concept, and be a visionary to strategically plan for the future. 


I possess skills and competence  to create a solid vision 


Strategic Objectives: 


Members: 

Engagement and Advocacy

Financial Wellness


Workforce:

Raise Capital

Engagement and Advocacy


Credit Union:

Financial Stability

Operational Excellence

Grow Intellectual Capital




Core Values:

Honor: 

Value the individual. Treat each person with dignity.  Strengthen relationships 


Integrity: 

We are trusted

We are respectful and honest 
Decisions based on what’s best for the 
members, the organization

Innovation / Continuous Improvement Embrace change, creativity, and innovation to respond to opportunities.

Unity: 

Organization’s vision and culture of helping 

Goal is achieved through support 

Collaborate 

Share one vision. Earn the trust of others through honesty, fairness, and professional conduct.


Service: 

Create a positive impression/outcome 

Build strong member confidence and satisfaction

Value in interacting with us

Build lifelong relationships through caring genuine hospitality, and superior service. 

Provide members extraordinary value.


Achievement: 

We are resilient; we overcome obstacles, changes, and challenges

Strive to be the best.  


Public and Community Service - People Network 


Represent members 


Provide products, services and benefits for all members 


Role Model 


Financial, Governance, Technology,  Risk Assessment Literacy


Life long learning


Pay Forward 


Educator, Business Administration,  Telecommunications, Educational Technology, Mathematics, Credit Union Certification - CUNA VAP, NAFCU 


Take responsibilities of my work seriously.


Naturally decisive and inspirational leader


I believe the role of Director for HIUSA is one I will excel in. 




Paradigm Shift - Fintech, AI, Digital technology, Information Governance



Ability to get the most out of everyone


the desire to create long-term relationships with stakeholders and important clients, 


Perform to a high standard to ensure HIUSA grows, thrives and meets financial targets/benchmarks 


 I am a passionate and results-driven person responsible for achieving success


three core elements to succeed:


1. Clear vision, action, timeframe. 


2. Decision-maker benefiting  members and the organization. 


3. Inspirational leader who motivates everyone towards the company objectives. 


My work is very important to me, and having researched and volunteered since 2001 and being a member of 3 credit unions since 1961, I feel the skills, qualities and competencies I possess are a perfect match for the position.



2.      How would you promote collaboration on the board?

 

On any board, collaboration is key.  I’m sure the current board members will agree as well.  Also, this is an existing question that is reworded.


Board collaboration and setting clear expectations 

Chair sets a clear expectation that the Board will function collaboratively and underlines the way that committees, structures and support systems are in place to support this approach

Support directors with collaborative technology

By using board management software to provide a secure messaging system, companies can encourage directors to communicate openly with one another and the CEO, while also being confident that messages will remain fully confidential and secure against accidental or deliberate interception.

Directors duties and clear action items for successful board collaboration


Embrace the process of board evaluation


  1. Share the company's mission 
  2. Communicate your expectation for collaboration.
  3. Define and communicate your team's goals.
  4. Highlight individuals' strengths.
  5. Promote a community working environment.
  6. Foster honest and open communication.
  7. Encourage creativity.& Brainstorm 
  8. Share knowledge, insight, and resources.
  9. Lead by example.
  10. Off site teaming
  11. Invest in collaboration tools.
  12. Celebrate and reward successful teamwork.


3.      What are your proudest accomplishments?

 

This will help us determine what type of person they are.  If the accomplishment is about themselves or about collaboration or team, that will tell character.


  1. Begin by making a list of your accomplishments. Put together two to three stories that you feel represent your best work as it relates to the position for which you're applying. ...
  2. Review the job description. ...
  3. Follow the STAR (Situation, Task, Approach and Result) approach.
Vision and Excellence 

Vision without action is merely a dreamAction without vision just passes time. Vision with action can change the world.
Target and Benchmark 

Pay Forward to students and community

As a lifelong educator, I believed in "ikigai." 


Everyone has an ikigai which is essentially waking up every day and enjoying life. 


I have taught my students and community valuable life lessons and promoted this lifelong concept. 


People helping people 


These concepts were instilled by my parents, teachers, and mentors. 


My parents believed in the credit union concept and started my account in 1961 (Hawaii State FCU), and 1979 (Pearl Harbor FCU).  I joined HawaiiUSA FCU in 1991 as an educator.



I have volunteered as a Board of Director (since 2014) and on the following committees (since 2001): Scholarship, Technology, Golf, Annual Banquet, Strategic Planning, Personnel, Loan Policy and Review, Governance, and Asset-Liability.


My background in Business Administration, Secondary Mathematics, Educational Technology and professional development activities have advanced my understanding of issues affecting our credit union. I have kept abreast of the latest global, financial, and technological developments.


I have completed numerous certification programs from both National Association of Federal Credit Union and Credit Union National Association, Inc. From daily operations to board governance, my ability to understand and analyze issues is critical. The Board of Directors work in partnership to strive for excellence. I am committed to the credit union industry and appreciate the opportunity to serve its members by providing superior financial products and services.


4.      What types of skills (personally and professionally) can you bring as a Board of Director?

 

This will tell us how they will contribute as a board member.  It is also an existing question that is reworded.


What skills do board members need?

Integrity
competence
insight
dedication
Passion


  • Dedicated and Committed. ...
  • Able to lead and influence others. ...
  • Straightforward and impartial. ...
  • Knowledgeable and an insatiable learner. ...
  • Values discretion and confidentiality.

Skills and Competencies 

Understands Member Needs 

Understands the credit union's mission, vision, and core values - Demonstrates commitment to service excellence - 

Demonstrates commitment to our brand "life matters" 

Independent Minded Remains objective - Voices opinion, asks questions, takes unpopular stand if necessary- 

Takes personal responsibility 

Financial Literacy 

Working familiarity with basic finance and accounting practices, including the ability to read and understand the credit union's balance sheet and income statement - 

Willingness to participate in continuing education 


Risk Management Experience 

Ability to assess risk - Ability to measure and control risk - 

Understanding of risks faced by credit unions and how risk can impact ability to meet goals and objectives 


Governance Expertise 

Understanding of governance practices – 

Understanding of credit union structure and composition – 

Understanding of laws/rules and regulations pertaining to credit unions 


Strong Network 

Relates well to all kinds of people, inside and outside of organization - Builds constructive and effective relationships; uses diplomacy and tact

Financial services industry, the governance of credit unions must be modernized to reflect relevant business practices and build organizational value for members. 

Strategic representation is positioning the credit union to serve a diverse and changing field of membership. 


Expectations 

a. Integrity and Ethics 

i. Accountable for his or her behavior and actions 

ii. Self-reliant capacity for accomplishment 

iii. Refrain from any activities that would be perceived as a conflict of interest for personal gain 

b. Independent-Minded 

i. Remains objective - Voices opinion, asks questions, takes unpopular stand if necessary 

ii. Takes personal responsibility 

ii. Willing to act independently and objectively 

c. Action-Oriented 

1. Regular Attendance 

ii Able to commit an average of five to ten hours of volunteer service per month to the Credit Union 

iii. Participate in continuing education 

d. Be prepared for all Board and Committee Meetings 

e. Basic understanding of Financial Statements 


Competencies 

a. Member Advocacy 

i. Represents the Members' needs 

ii. Makes decisions in the best interest of the Membership 

ii. Focuses on the Value to the Membership 

b. Organizational Commitment 

i. Understands Credit Union's Mission, Vision, and Values 

ii. Demonstrates commitment to 'Life Matters' brand 

ii. Acts in the best interest of the organization 

iv. Strategic Ambassador for the Credit Union in the Community 

v. Make decisions on behalf of the organization 

vi. Organizational needs come first 

C. Interpersonal Responsiveness

i. Advocate for the empowerment of all individuals 

ii. Listens respectively and effectively 

iii. Truth with harmony 

iv. Resolves issues resolved in a timely manner 

v. Networking skills 

1. Relates well to all kinds of people 

2. Builds constructive and effective relationships 

3. Uses diplomacy and tact 

d. Governance Expertise 

i. Understanding of governance practices 

ii. Understands the Credit Union structure and composition 

iii. Understands and ensures compliance with the laws and regulations related to Credit Unions 

Visionary Leadership 

i. Understands the Credit Union Value Chain 

ii. Able to identify gaps in current performance and desired future state 

Iii. Make recommendations based upon a global perspective, industry trends, data analysis, and risk management practices 

iv. Helps Credit Union develop a clear Strategic Plan. 

v. Applies a systems perspective towards managing change and guiding the organization into the future 

Technical Expertise 

i. Having one or more of the following: 

1. Financial Services Industry Experience 

2. Executive Level Experience 

3. Expert in Financial Statements and generally accepted accounting principles 

4. Risk Management Experience


Knowledge:

Technology to regulation to business analytics. 

Aware at a high level, and how they can affect the credit union while refraining from getting involved in the operations of the institution. 

Boards should be looking on the horizon to the financial services landscape and simply guiding the credit union toward a destination that changes the lives of their members today and into the future.


High-performing boards shape the direction of the credit union through its mission, strategic plan, purpose statement and critical policies. 

Reassess policies to benefit members and community

Seamless process for new account openings, digital, reducing paperwork, simplifying the legalese 

Resources to support the vision. 

Digital investment 

Cybersecurity: Are those being properly supported as well? Every year should bring an increasing technology budget. 


 

5.      HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union’s brand is “Life matters”; tell us what this means to you and how you would live the brand as a Board of Director?

 

Previously, we asked about what our core values mean and this question is reworded to see if our brand resonates with them since all of us (Board, Staff and Volunteers) should be living our brand of Life matters.

 


As a lifelong educator, I believed in "ikigai." Everyone has an ikigai which is essentially waking up every day and enjoying life. I have taught my students valuable life lessons and promoted this lifelong concept.  These concepts were instilled by my parents, teachers, and mentors.  


Grandfather Model Father Postal Worker 

Grandmother ran store


In fact, my parents believed in the credit union concept and started my account in 1961 (Hawaii State FCU), and 1979 (Pearl Harbor FCU).  I joined HawaiiUSA FCU in 1991 as an educator.



elementary slippers / barefoot

Farm / plantation

Minimum wage - Dole Cannery 

10 summers dedication


Single mom


Save money


Low income



Lunch token


Financial Planning


Vision


温故 (On-ko) is to ask old things. 知新(Chi-shin) is to know new things.
-->Literary means "By asking old things know new things".

Explaining
In order to get to know new things that you have not experienced you can learn from old things like the past. You can get wisdom from the history.

This is the Japanese proverb by Chinese thinker and social philosopher Confucius. He gave a big impact to Japanese thinkers.

温故知新(wenguzhixin). gain new insights through restudying old materials. 举一反三( juyifansan). draw inferences about other cases


6.      What do you think are the characteristics of a great board member?

 

This will help us understand what is important to them and how they would contribute to the board

 

  • Dedicated and Committed. ...
  • Able to lead and influence others. ...
  • Straightforward and impartial. ...
  • Knowledgeable and an insatiable learner. ...
  • Values discretion and confidentiality.

Honor: Value the individual. Treat each person with dignity.  Strengthen relationships with enthusiasm, energy and compassion.

Integrity: 

We are trusted; we do what we said we would do

We are respectful and honest in every business and interpersonal dealings
We consider the impact on others; we make decisions based on what’s best for the 
members, the organization, and our teammates

Innovation / Continuous Improvement: Be flexible, seek new and better ideas.  Embrace change, creativity, and innovation to respond to opportunities.

Unity: 

We bring to life our organization’s vision and culture of helping one another 

We support and work with others until the goal is achieved
We collaborate to resolve conflict and create win-win relationships

Share one vision. Earn the trust of others through honesty, fairness, and professional conduct.


Service: 

We create a positive impression/outcome during each interaction

We build strong member confidence and satisfaction

Our members and employees find value in interacting with us

Build lifelong relationships through caring genuine hospitality, and superior service.  Provide members extraordinary value.


Achievement: 

We are true to our profession and continuously seek to renew our skills and knowledge level

We are responsible and strive for personal accountability for results

We are resilient; we overcome obstacles, changes, and challenges

Strive to be the best.  Take personal responsibility and fulfill commitments promptly and in a timely manner.



The Board's oversight functions involve monitoring the credit union's business and affairs including financial performance, management performance, corporate and risk management policies and compliance with legal obligations and credit union policy.


7.      How much time can you commit to being an effective Board member?

 

This is an existing question reworded and is designed to gauge their commitment


My experience depends on the committees assigned. 


Preparation time for meeting: 3 hours


The BOD meeting can last up to 5 hours. 


Committee meetings last about 3 hours.



Time varies 3- 5 hours / week

Up to 25 hours a month



The ultimate goal of credit union governance is to link the member-owners to the organization and establish accountability, and the following five elements of good governance can help boards operate in a way that delivers results:

  • Boards must have ground rules (policies)
  • Boards must establish parameters (boundaries) within which management can operate.
  • Boards must maintain accountability. The CEO must be accountable to the board, the board must be accountable to the member-owners, and the board members must be accountable to one another.
  • Boards must identify a clear set of performance targets.
  • Boards must actively monitor the performance of the credit union.

1. Fiduciary

In the fiduciary model, the board has stewardship over the tangible assets of the membership and ensures the credit union uses resources effectively and efficiently. The board tracks the credit union’s results against its strategic plan, which aims to minimize risk against a set of performance expectations. Leadership is hierarchical and asks, “Is anything wrong?” The board decides by reaching resolution on issues.

How it monitors performance:

The board primarily relies oninstitutional performance metricsto assess if management is on track. These include traditional measures such as return on assets, capital adequacy, delinquency, and efficiency. The board might set these measures relative to historical performance, it might target a new level of achievement, or it might compare its performance against peers (e.g. top 25% of ROA).

2. Strategic

In the strategic model, the board has a partnership with management that addresses how the organization should evolve. This type of leadership is visionary and asks, “What is the plan?” Board members make decisions by reaching consensus. They know they have arrived at an answer when all the pieces fit together.


3. Generative

The generative model is a lesser-known but critical source of organizational leadership. It poses the question, “What problems should we solve?” This reflective leadership plays a sense-making role that focuses on the credit union’s external environment. The board makes decisions by grappling and grasping with tough issues; members know they have the answer when it all makes sense.





Professional Entertainer

1992 – Present: Magician & Balloon Entertainer

International Awards & Conference Presenter: International Brotherhood of Magicians (IBM),  Society of American Magicians,(SAM), Texas Association of Magician's (TAOM), Pacific Coast Association of Magician (PCAM), Fellowship of Christian Magician's Convention, New Zealand International Magicians Convention, Hong Kong Convention, Japan Convention, and Canadian Association of Magicians


Kelvin Chun | People on the Move






About HawaiiUSA FCU

HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union is a not-for-profit federally insured financial cooperative owned and operated by our members. Chartered in 1936, we serve individuals in the field of education including employees, retirees, students and their parents of Oahu schools except secondary schools in Honolulu.

Vision Statement:

HawaiiUSA will be recognized as the "Life matters" organization that makes financial dreams come true.

Mission Statement:

HawaiiUSA improves our members' lives through our "Life matters" commitment.

Core Values:

At HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union we are joining together to make

a positive difference in people’s lives. Our Core Values guide the way we make decisions. 


Honor: Value the individual. Treat each person with dignity.  Strengthen relationships with enthusiasm, energy and compassion.

Integrity: 

We are trusted; we do what we said we would do

We are respectful and honest in every business and interpersonal dealings
We consider the impact on others; we make decisions based on what’s best for the 
members, the organization, and our teammates

Innovation / Continuous Improvement: Be flexible, seek new and better ideas.  Embrace change, creativity, and innovation to respond to opportunities.

Unity: 

We bring to life our organization’s vision and culture of helping one another 

We support and work with others until the goal is achieved
We collaborate to resolve conflict and create win-win relationships

Share one vision. Earn the trust of others through honesty, fairness, and professional conduct.


Service: 

We create a positive impression/outcome during each interaction

We build strong member confidence and satisfaction

Our members and employees find value in interacting with us

Build lifelong relationships through caring genuine hospitality, and superior service.  Provide members extraordinary value.


Achievement: 

We are true to our profession and continuously seek to renew our skills and knowledge level

We are responsible and strive for personal accountability for results

We are resilient; we overcome obstacles, changes, and challenges

Strive to be the best.  Take personal responsibility and fulfill commitments promptly and in a timely manner.

HawaiiUSA’s mission is to be the primary provider of financial services to our members. 

Our Board of Directors and staff pledge to achieve this goal through a total commitment to service excellence. 
We will maintain financial strength and stability to support growth and to provide diverse services to our members.

Member deposits are insured up to $250,000 by the National Credit Union Administration.

Credit Union History


This is a common question with a not-so-common-knowledge answer. Credit unions are not-for-profit financial institutions, owned by their members. Members pool their money for the credit union to lend to other members. Profits earned are returned to members in the form of lower fees, higher dividends, and/or other benefits. Hence, the credit union motto, “People helping people.” 

HawaiiUSA has been living this motto for 80 years. From our roots as Oahu Teachers No. 3 Federal Credit Union serving Hawaii Department of Education employees, retirees, students, and their parents, to the many businesses and associational groups we welcome today, helping people is simply what we do; or shall we say, it’s what all of you – our members – do!

HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union has been providing financial services to our members for over 80 years. 


In 1936, teachers and principals on the Island of Oahu bonded together to form three credit unions based on grade levels that took advantage of the new federal regulations enabling organizations with a common bond to form credit unions.

Our Credit Union opened its doors on November 6, 1936 as Oahu Teachers No. 3 Federal Credit Union. Our field of membership was comprised of elementary school teachers of schools in the Honolulu District, as well as teachers of schools of all grade levels in what was then called “rural” Oahu. Over the years, our credit union benefited from the tremendous growth of population and the corresponding expansion of the school system in the Leeward, Central and Windward districts.

Our credit union ended its first year of operation with 138 members and assets of $4,499. We have since grown into the largest credit union in Hawaii by asset size of more than $1.5 billion, and is also the largest credit union by membership with more than 131,000 members being served through 14 branch locations on the islands of Oahu and Maui.  

The membership has changed to include not only teachers, but also principals and other school employees such as secretaries, counselors, cafeteria workers, volunteers and janitorial staff. Employees of all schools (not only elementary) outside the Honolulu school district as well as students and parents are eligible to join. In 1971, our name was changed to Oahu Educational Employees Federal Credit Union.

For many years, the membership remained predominately teacher and school oriented, providing a stable yet maturing membership base. There were several amendments to our charter expanding the field of membership to its current approved position, which include 5,800-plus Select Employee Groups (SEGs). A significant membership amendment occurred when the definition of immediate family member was revised to include those living outside of the household.

On February 23, 2000, the Board of Directors approved to change our name to HawaiiUSA Federal Credit Union. This process of a name change was important not only to accurately reflect the changes in our membership but also to gain a marketing advantage for membership expansion. Although our core membership and focus remains with the educational community, the passage of legislation by Congress allowed HawaiiUSA FCU to aggressively seek membership expansion through Select Employee Groups. After months of planning and pre-notifications, the conversion to our new name was completed on July 1, 2000. Our new name better depicts our current field of membership and lays the foundation to provide service to our members statewide and possibly nationwide.


Board of Directors:

assume fiduciary responsibility, 

do not receive compensation, 

and may require many hours of time commitment. 

Some of the skills and competencies needed are:

Ability to understand and appreciate the Mission of HawaiiUSA and needs of its members;

Independent-minded to advocate for the members’ best interests;

Financial literacy encompassing a working familiarity of basic finance and accounting practices and procedures;

Risk Management experience in evaluating the opportunities and challenges of HawaiiUSA in the financial services industry;

Governance experience to lead HawaiiUSA in its Life matterscommitment; and

Diplomacy and strong network of community contacts.

Professional Development:
Today’s credit unions demand board members make strategic, effective decisions. The board must regularly review to ensure the board and credit unions operate at the highest levels.



Degrees, Certifications, Licenses:

June 30, 2016: Computer Education K-12, Mathematics 7-12; Hawaii Teacher Standards Board.

September 15, 2015, August, 2017: Certified Credit Union Volunteer (CCUV)  Board of Directors Certificate.


June 23, 2015, July 6, 2017: Certified Volunteer Expert Course, National Association of Federal Credit Union.

August 2009: Elementary K-6, Economics K-12, Mathematics K-12; Certificate of NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher.

Education: University of Hawaii (UH)


May, 1995: College of Education, Master of Education (M. Ed.), Major: Educational Technology.

May, 1993: College of Arts and Science, Graduate Certificate, Major: Telecommunication Information Resource Management (TIRM).

May, 1986: Leeward Community College, Major: Accounting, Associate in Science (AS).

May, 1985: Leeward Community College, Major: Information and Computer Science (AS).

December, 1983: College of Education, Professional Diploma (PD), Major: Secondary Education - Mathematics.

May, 1982: College of Business Administration, Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA), Major: Business Economics & Quantitative Methods.



Credit Union National Association


September, 2015: CUNA Volunteer Certification Program


Areas of Study

CUNA Volunteer Achievement Program, Hawaii Credit Union League and the Credit Union National Association, Inc.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


September 29, 2015:

Thomas Doig Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 48 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03

September 21, 2015: Strategic Planning Certification.

September 16, 2015: Governance Certification.

September 16, 2015: CEO Oversight Certification.

September 16, 2015: Board Operations & Development Certification.

September 15, 2015: Safety and Soundness Certification.


September 11, 2015: Regulatory Compliance Award


September 11, 2015: Credit Committee Award


September 10, 2015: Dora Maxwell Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 42 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03

 

September 2, 2015: 

Louise Herring Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 36 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03


September 2, 2015: 

Alphonse Desjardins Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 30 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03


September 2, 2015: 

Roy F. Bergengren Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 24 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03


September 2, 2015: 


Friedrich Raiffeisen Certificate and Pin

Awarded when any 18 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03

 


September 2, 2015: Credit Union Services Award 


September 2, 2015: Supervisory Committee Award


August 26, 2015: Board of Directors Award


August 26, 2015: Board Financial Literacy Certificate

August 26, 2015:

Credit Union Leadership Certificate and Pin
Awarded when leadership courses Strategic Credit Union Leadership (V700), Directing Effective Teams (V701), and Maximizing Board Performance (V702) are completed in addition to the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03


August 26, 2015:

Edward Filene Certificate and Pin
Awarded when any 12 VAP courses are completed including the prerequisites V01, V02 and V03


Credit Union - Committee / Training:


2016-2017  HIUSA FCU Board of Director Vice Chair

2014:  Present: HIUSA FCU Board of Director Volunteer


2001 - Present: HIUSA FCU Volunteer: Technology, Entertainment, & Golf Committee

Kelvin served on the following committees: Scholarship, Technology, Golf, Annual Banquet, Personnel, Loan Policy and Review, Workforce, Strategic planning, Governance, and Asset-Liability.


Conferences:
Directors will return to their board better able to contribute, provide strategic direction, and face the changing landscape of the credit union movement.


May 2-4, 2019
HCUL 
Kona, Hawaii

May 17 - 19, 2018
HCUL
Lahaina, Maui


April 6-8, 2017: Next Generation Solutions: (Kauai), HCUL 79th annual convention
April 21-23, 2016: (Waikaloa, Hawaii), HCUL 78th annual convention
August 18, 2015: (Honolulu), CU Volunteer 202 workshop 
April 23-25, 2015: (Honolulu, Oahu), HCUL 77th annual convention
May 15-17, 2014: (Wailea, Maui), Bridge to a Better Future, HCUL76th annual convention



August 4-7, 2015: Las Vegas, NV, 39th Director's & CEO Leadership Convention

November 6-9, 2014: Las. Vegas, NV, Reaching your Members in the 21st Century



September 8-11, 2019

NAFCU Congressional Caucus 2019
Washington DC

June 17-20, 2019
America's Credit Union Conference
Walt Disney World Resort, Florida




September, 2018
NAFCU Congressional Caucus 2018
Washington DC

June 28- July 1, 2018
America's Credit Union Conference
Boston

June 24-28, 2017: Congressional Caucus in Washington, D.C.
America's Credit Union Conference, Las Vegas, NV

September 10-13, 2017: 
June 13-16, 2017:

50th Annual Conference and Solutions ExpoHawaii Convention Center

June 14-17, 2016: Nashville, TN, NAFCU 49th Annual Conference and Solutions Expo
June 22-27, 2015: Montreal, Canada, NAFCU 48th Annual Conference and Solutions Expo

International Summit of Cooperatives
October 11-13, 2016: Quebec City, Canada, Cooperatives, the Power to Act

Webinar
What Directors Should Know About CECL, ALLL, and New Credit Impairment Standards (03/2016)


June 26, 2014: Accounting & Risk Seminar, Waialae Country Club/ Kwock & Company CPAs.
June 26, 2014: Watchdog Mini Series #18: Strategic Planning,Waialae Country Club/ Kwock & Company CPAs.

April, 11, 2008: Internet and Computing Core Certification (IC3), Certiport.

March 18, 1993: Facilitative Leadership, Interaction Associates Seminar.

State why you would like to serve as a Board of Director

I would like to serve as a Board of Director to represent our members, to promote the "Life Matters" concept, and be a visionary to strategically plan for the future.

As a lifelong educator, I believed in "ikigai." Everyone has an ikigai which is essentially waking up every day and enjoying life. I have taught my students valuable life lessons and promoted this lifelong concept.  These concepts were instilled by my parents, teachers, and mentors.  In fact, my parents believed in the credit union concept and started my account in 3-1961 (Hawaii State FCU), and 8-1978 (Pearl Harbor FCU).  I joined HawaiiUSA FCU in 1991 as an educator.

I have volunteered as a Board of Director (since 2014) and on the following committees (since 2001): Scholarship, Technology, Golf, Annual Banquet, Strategic Planning, Personnel, Loan Policy and Review, Governance, and Asset-Liability.

My background in Business Administration, Secondary Mathematics, Educational Technology and professional development activities have advanced my understanding of issues affecting our credit union. I have kept abreast of the latest global, financial, and technological developments.

I have completed numerous certification programs from both National Association of Federal Credit Union and Credit Union National Association, Inc. From daily operations to board governance, my ability to understand and analyze issues is critical. The Board of Directors work in partnership to strive for excellence. I am committed to the credit union industry and appreciate the opportunity to serve its members by providing superior financial products and services. Thank you for your support.


State why you would like to serve as a Board Director. (50-word maximum)

I would like to serve as a Board of Director to represent our members and promote the "Life Matters" concept, and be a visionary to strategically plan for the future. As a member of three credit unions for 60 years, I understand the role of contributing back to the community.

If elected, what will be your focus for HawaiiUSA FCU? (50-word maximum)

I will focus on Future Financial Technology and New Normals:

1. Applications of machine learning in financial services and regulation

2. Algorithms and Big Data emerging risk management perspectives

3. Artificial intelligence and Digital Identification Technologies and Combatting Fraud (Cybersecurity)

4.Automation and its impact on jobs in financial services

What do you feel is the biggest opportunity/challenge for HawaiiUSA FCU? (50-word maximum)

With the increasing popularity of digital banks and marketplace lenders, traditional banks and credit unions are encountering the folowing challenges:

1. Meeting the Digital Expectations of the Customers

2. For Credit: Digital is Not Enough

3. Dealing with Security Issues

4. Marketing Efforts

5. Training Employees

6. Relationship banking

What skill sets do you possess that meet the skills and competencies of a Board Director? (50-word maximum)

I have volunteered since 2001 and have been a life long learner modeling the life matters philosophy.  My educational background and professional development allowed for advancement in certifications.I will apply my financial and technical skills to represent the members' needs and prepare for the constantly changing environment.
























On-line Exams:
Today’s rapidly changing credit union climate has credit unions relying more heavily than ever on the leadership skills of their elected officials.  In fact, to keep up with this pace more and more credit unions are requiring continuing education for their volunteers.  CUNA’s Volunteer Achievement Program (VAP) helps volunteers learn how to work together effectively, make informed decisions, and improve credit union performance.






Subpages (1): BOD insights
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