Liminal Limbo

Introduction

So here i find myself in a limbo, between finishing my BA at Carmarthen School of Art and starting my MA at Swansea College of Art.

I am in a liminal space, i have studied liminality before, during my second year BA, now its personal!

I will begin by explaining the most recent work i have been making, how that runs on from my Major Project (BA) and where i hope it will lead.

Essentially i want to fill in some gaps and prepare myself for the MA. I am concentrating on drawing and painting landscapes, reading some philosophy, watching a few films and studying artists that should inform me on the way. I think that desolation does seem to encourage existential contemplation and i find myself stripping back to find ways forward.

I needed to finish off the Derrida i had been reading and i will also catch up on some Freud that i had previously skipped over. The book list on my bibliography all concern artists that appeal to me from differing approaches. The Albers' book i had been meaning to work through but never seemed to have the time, reading 'On Being An Artist' by Michael Craig-Martin (suggested to me by Craig Woods) was the nudge that prompted me that this is as good a time as any to get on with it!

'About Looking' by Berger is the final book i am reading during this project and i think it is a great choice to prepare me philosophically for the initial module of the MA titled 'The Thought Experiment'.

I needed to get my head around 'Ulysses' by James Joyce, i keep coming across references to it but i don't think i have the time to read the whole book at the moment. As a compromise i watched the film adaptation directed by Joseph Strick. It was worth doing, if just to satisfy my curiosity, a rabbit hole in my research and not really concerned with my current investigations, but i now understand its controversy.

Other films i am watching to help inform my practice are listed in the bibliography. The list may seem eclectic, but for me the films do all have something in common; in that the pace is often slow and they look at life and what is now a different world in unusual ways.