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Bob Sweetan (1940-2017)

      

Real NameRobert Carson (born “Robert Beier”)

Lifespan - 7/4/1940 - 2/10/2017

5’10” 285 lbs. - Goodsoil, SAS


Athletic BackgroundFootball [CFL], Boxing

Teacher(s)Stu Hart

Professional BackgroundStampede(`65-`71), Maritimes(`66), Portland(`67), Kansas City(`69-`70), St. Louis(`69-`70), JWA(`71), Kansas City(`74), Georgia(`74), Tri-State(`74-`75), Gulf Coast(`74-`76), Tri-State(`76-`77), Kansas City(`77-`82), St. Louis(`77-`82), Amarillo(`78-`79), Mid-South(`79), San Francisco(`79-`80), Tri-State(`81), IWE(`81), SWCW(`82-`85), WWC(`83-`84), UWF(`84), Mid-South(`85), TASW(`85)

AliasesBob Carsen, K.O. Cox, K.O. Kox

Peak Years`69-`79


Place in HistoryHaving a bad reputation in the pro-wrestling business is not all that unusual, but the reputation of Bob Sweetan is amongst the worst around.  Being a bully or being a generally miserable is not all that unusual, but Sweetan became notorious as a locker room thief, as a heavy drug user and later in life was deported back to Canada after legal issues related to sexually abusing his daughter and not paying child support.  His former wife has described him as an abusive father who deserted his family for a drug dealing ring rat and never admitted his mistakes.  Robert Beier was a rugged farm boy from Western Canada.  He made his way to the Canadian Football League and when that did not pan out he headed back West.  While he might have been a free spirit who wanted to see the world, he ended up living hard and fast and was never able to give it up.  Stu Hart broke him in and he took the name “Bruiser Bob Sweetan,” which he used for most of his career.  After a few years learning the ropes, he was partnered up with the younger wrestler who became his “brother” Freddie.  The pair were natural heels with Bob really relishing the role of instigating the crowds.  They became K.O. Cox and Killer Cox respectively in Kansas City before going their separate ways.  Bob Sweetan continued to run the roads and typically found success wherever he went.  He was an intense and physical bad guy and generally considered a very good worker by his peers, even if his personality left something to be desired.  

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