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Steve Grey

Real Name - Steve Green

Birthdate - 11/5/??

5'6" 147 lbs. - Peckham, London, England


Athletic Background - Soccer, Swimming, Tennis

Teacher(s) - n/a

Aliases - none

Peak Years - `75-`85


Finisher(s) - 

- Surfboard (Rito Romero Special)

- High Crossbody

- Sunset Flip

- Side Cradle


Favorites -

- Rolling Stepover Toehold

- Standing Dropkick

- Monkey Flip

- Headbutt to Gut

- Snap Mare



Ringwork Rating - 

 Move Set9
 Science8
 Aerial2
 Power6
 Strikes5


Intangibles Rating - 

 Entertainment6
 Selling8
 Bumping6
 Carrying8
 Heat6
 Legacy5


Place in History - When Steve Grey was first breaking into the pro-wrestling scene in 1970, it was at a peak, in terms of both popularity and talent.  When ITV cancelled World of Sport in 1988, he was arguably at the top of his game and had been featured on the show more times over the years than most.  Grey was, in most ways, the ideal blue-eye. He was youthful and athletic, he was willing to take on larger opponents and his teaching carpentry to the elderly and handicapped really put him over the top.  Steve Grey was excellent in babyface matches with people like Johnny Saint or Clive Myers where he could put his technical skill on display to its fullest. When paired with villains like Jim Breaks or Mal Sanders, he shined in a completely different way.  Grey was able to sell a beating, show great fire and had an exciting arsenal of moves. In 1978, Grey captured the British Lightweight title in a tournament after it was vacated by the Dynamite Kid. He upset Johnny Saint the following year to enjoy a short run with World Lightweight title.  Between 1978 and 1984, Grey held the British title five times with several reigns lasting nearly a year. He developed a memorable rivalry with Jim Breaks and they exchanged that title as well as the British Welterweight on several occasions. In 1988, Grey beat Breaks for the European Lightweight title, making him one of the few to hold all three titles in that weight division.  Even after the collapse of the British wrestling scene, Steve Grey continued to work regularly and while he might have lost some speed and agility, he was still able to work holds into the new millennium.

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