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Dick Shikat (1897 - 1968)


Real Name

Richard Scheckat

Lifespan - 1/11/1897 - 12/3/1968

6’1” 225 lbs. - Ragnitz, Tilsit, East Prussia


Athletic Background

Greco-Roman Wrestling


Teacher(s) - n/a

Aliases

Dick Shickat


Peak Years1930s


Place in History

Dick Shikat is probably best remembered in the annals of pro-wrestling history for his double-cross of Danno O’Mahoney in 1936.  The infamous match pried the best heavyweight title claim away from the Trust in an interesting powerplay by some outside promoters for a time.  Shikat grew up as a Prussian who would serve in the German Navy during the Great War.  He and Hans Steike became friends as sizable Greco-Roman wrestlers  who toured Europe before heading to the US.  Scheckat eventually became Shikat, adopted the American Catch-as-Catch-can style and established himself as a rising contender in the early 30s.  Under the tutelage of Toots Mondt, Shikat was positioned as a capable German challenger to the popular Jim Londos.  In front of around 30,000 fans in Philadelphia, Shikat defeated Londos.  The win and subsequent 10-month reign established Dick Shikat as a top star and he would be a drawing card for years to come.  Although his motives are debated, Shikat enjoyed a second reign that was brief and shrouded in controversy.  Was he paid off by Jack Pfefer and other promoters?  Was he seeking revenge for being passed over by Jim Browning?  Was he looking to refresh his status as a top wrestler?  Whatever the reason, Shikat was a champion and a lawsuit went out against him.  The incident could have done serious damage to an already damaged sport, but instead he dropped the title to Ali Baba (who was double-crossed himself soon after).  Shikat’s wife died soon after and he sort of sunk into obscurity after that.  He wrestled off and on into the 1950s, but branched out into numerous avenues.  Dick Shikat is not one of the most famous pro-wrestlers of the 1930s, but he was unquestionably a stellar wrestler, had a legitimate reputation and was a bonafide drawing card.



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