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"Moondog" Lonnie Mayne (1944-1978)


Real NameRonald Doyle Mayne

Birthdate - 9/12/44 - 8/13/78

5’11” 270 lbs. - Fairfax, CA


Athletic BackgroundFootball [University of Southern Utah]

Teacher(s)Kenny Mayne, Jules Strongbow

Professional BackgroundUtah(`65), Los Angeles(`65-`66), Portland(`66-`72), San Francisco(`66), JWA(`66,`68), Vancouver(`69-`70), Hawaii(`71-`72), San Francisco(`73), WWWF(`73), Georgia(`75-`76), Dallas(`76-`77), San Francisco(`77-`78), Los Angeles(`77-`78)

AliasesMad Dog Mayne

Peak Years`67-`72

Place in HistoryThere was always “excitement in the air” with Lonnie “Moondog” Mayne, a bleach blond wildman who left a mark on every fan who ever saw him.  People often forget that Mayne only had a thirteen year career and died in his early 30s.  Pro-wrestling has seen many die young and while some had notable success, many succumbed to demons that had hobbled their careers.  Lonnie Mayne accomplished a great deal in his career, headlining in most promotions he worked for and becoming one of the most unforgettable characters of his era.  The son of Kenny Wayne, Lonnie followed his father into the business after his collegiate football career.  He got started in Salt Lake City, where his father had the book, before heading to Los Angeles and then on to Portland.  Promoter Don Owen did not see much in Mayne initially, but veteran Tony Borne saw the strong personality and took the youngster under his wing and together they formed a powerhouse tag team.  Opposite area local heroes like Pepper Martin, Shag Thomas, Stan Stasiak and Dean Ho, they were hated bad guys for years.  They also worked the nearby Vancouver territory regularly during this time period.  After their initial split, Mayne teamed with the flamboyant Beauregarde and battled Borne, Mad Dog Vachon, Luther Lindsay and the like to establish himself as a top heel.  As a result, he periodically went off to Hawaii or California and after a good run there, Moondog Mayne returned to Portland to raise hell again.  When entering a new market, the Moondog’s crazed look and big bumping in-ring style could get him over, but it was his promos that certainly did.  Whether was eating goldfish or glass, cutting himself or simply ranting like a lunatic, Mayne was one-of-a-kind when a microphone was put in front of him.  Mayne and Borne reunited and while they were an institution in the area, their second run was not quite as successful.  This run ended with Borne as the heel, turning on the younger Lonnie Mayne and finally giving him that babyface run that the fans were itching for in the prior years.  Whether he was working as a single or teaming with Dutch Savage, Mayne was arguably the biggest star in the area and promoters elsewhere were interested in him.  He had some tours elsewhere, challenging Pedro Morales for the WWWF title in the Northeast, teaming with Luke Graham and battling Mr. Wrestling II in the Southeast and holding the Texas Heavyweight title for a time.  However, Mayne preferred to spend most of his time in his home state of California and adopted home of Oregon (despite being billed from the fictional town of Crabtree, Arkansas).  By the late 1970s, Moondog Mayne was a hot property on the West Coast, working on top for the Portland, San Francisco and Los Angeles offices simultaneously.  He had trimmed down and was said to be cleaning himself up after years of extreme alcohol abuse.  His rivalries with young up-and-comers like Roddy Piper, Don Muraco and the Guerreros helped them establish themselves.  According to his family, he was looking to wind his career down.  Sadly, the Moondog met a tragic end in 1978.  While it is uncertain whether he was seriously ill, intoxicated or simply fell asleep at the wheel, the fact is his car went into another lane and took his life and the life of another.  It was a death in a time when few active wrestlers died.  Unfortunately, there is limited footage of Lonnie Mayne and he worked in territories that were either not the premier territories or were in down periods.  He was a headliner through for most of his career and was respected by his peers as a tremendous worker and entertainer.

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