California

Megabalanus coccopoma Titan Acorn Barnacle

The colorful pink Titan Acorn Barnacle has become increasingly common on the beaches of northeast Florida since early 2006. This invasive species, which can grow to an impressive size of over two inches in height and width, is native to the western coast of the Americas from California to Ecuador but has now spread to both the Gulf of Mexico and the U. S. Eastern Seaboard. The species was first documented in northeast Florida on 9/24/2004 when a large dead specimen was found in the wrack line at Big Talbot Island State Park following the passing of Hurricane Jeanne (see: Perna viridis (Linnaeus, 1758) Asian Green Mussel). Since that time the species has become increasingly common and is now very common on fixed structure such as the south St. Johns River Jetty at Mayport Naval station and even "The Poles" which separate Kathryn Abbey Hanna Park from the Naval base. The image below, right, shows a larges number of the barnacles attached to a piece of debris washed onto the beach. An Asian Green Mussel (also an exotic Pacific species first found living in northeast Florida on 7/28/2003 - See: U. S. Naval Station Invaded) is shown on the left with a single Titan Acorn Barnacle attached. The photograph was taken at Mayport Naval Station on 2/3/2007 and the Asian Green Mussel measured 77 mm. in length.

Megabalanus coccopoma Titan Acorn Barnacle