Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (USA)

 

Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (beach suncup or beach evening primrose) is a species of the evening primrose family and is native to open dunes and sandy soils of coastal California and Oregon.
The beach suncup grows prostrate along the beach surface, forming mats more than 1 m across. It forms long stems growing from a central crown, lined with silvery grey-green leaves. The prostrate form and swinging stems allow the plant to survive well on the windy, shifting sands of the coast. The four-petalled flowers open in the morning (typical among suncups) and are bright yellow, fading to reddish.
(From Wikipedia on 4.12.14)

 
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Wild Plant For ID : California : 20NOV14 : AK-46 : 3 posts by 3 authors. Attachments (2)
This small wild plant with yellow flowers was seen growing in sand, near a beach in San Francisco on 1st Oct, 14.
On searching, it looked similar to Beach Primrose, Camissonia cheiranthifolia.
Experts kindly confirm id.
could be
like to see hairy leaves on the branches bearing the flowers
if they are, then most likely, yes.
 
 
  
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