Geranium collinum ?

 
jer-AY-nee-um -- from the Greek geranos, crane; referring to the beak-like fruit ... Dave's Botanary
KOL-in-um -- hilly; grows on hills ... Dave's Botanary

commonly known as: hill geranium • Kashmiri (Ladakhi): ལེགཏིན legkatin

Native to: s & s-e Europe towards c Asia, n-w Himalaya
 
Perennial herb up to 80 cm tall with elongated horizontal rhizome, stems ascending to erect with retrorse hairs and some spreading glandular hairs; stipules lanceolate, 6-8 mm long; leaves opposite, petiole up to 12 cm long in lower leaves, upper shorter; blade rounded, 2-8 cm broad,5-7 lobed to about middle, segments wedge-shaped further 3-5-lobed; flowers 25-30 mm across, lilac to lilac-purple, usually in 2-flowered cluster on up to 15 cm long ascending to recurved peduncle; pedicel up to 5 cm long; bracteoles linear-lanceolate; sepals 5-9 mm long, elliptic-oblong, with 1-2 mm long mucro, pubescent; petals 12-18 mm long, obovate, rounded to retuse at tip; filaments triangular and hairy at base; mericarps pubescent, with up to 2.5 cm long beak.
  
 
Habitat: sloping meadow
Habit: small herb, about 50 cm high,
Looks like Geranium collinum from the following features.
Flowers paired, pink/purple without dark veins
Stamens light colored
Leaved deeply divided into widely separated lobes.
However, ... mention of the size seems to be on the lower side. I would have expected 2.5 cm or more.
Moreover,
Geranium collinum is reported from VoF.
More arguments in support of Geranium collinum:
Zoomed view of the flower shows that the petals have hairy margin at the base, consistent with G. colinum.
Compare the leaves with the attached sketch of G. collinum from Flora of Pakistan.
Yes Geranium collinum looks more logical.
I currently cannot put a firm name on this- shall comment further in due course. Further to my recent post about photographing Geraniums.  I am far from certain that the true Geranium collinum is found in the Himalaya. This is a complicated matter. Let me try to explain. It has certainly been thought to in the past. Stewart e.g. listed this species from the Khardong La in his 'The Flora of Ladakh' (1916-17) - I have not seen the pressed specimen but from the altitude and location, I would think this is probably what I understand to be G.regelii. He also listed G.grandiflorum (which is now Geranium himalayense). The images above do not come close to my understanding of either of these species - nor G.pratense subsp. stewartianum a specimen of which I saw near Sonamarg which Peter Yeo at Cambridge identified as this in 1987.  Dickore & Klimes (2005) which is the most up-to-date checklist for Ladakh do not include G.collinum only G. himalayense, pratense, regelii and sibiricum. 
In 'The Valley of Flowers' book G.pratense, collinum, wallichianum and grevilleanum (now G.lambertii) were listed.
In the Notes Yeo supplied me, he draws attention to the problematical G.collinum-pratense-himalayense alliance. He considered this was particularly critical in the NW Himalaya with high quality pressed specimens needed (nowadays these can be supplemented and sometimes replaced by high quality digital images (provided the advice given below is followed). This alliance has pink to blue flowers (sometimes white) in which the stamen-tip and stigmas are never blackish-purple...

Balsaminaceae, Geraniaceae and Oxalidaceae Week :: DV01 :: 02 AUG 12 11:59 :: Geranium collinum at Valley of Flowers :
Geraniaceae
Geranium collinum Stephan ex Willd.
jer-AY-nee-um -- from the Greek geranos, crane; referring to the beak-like fruit ... Dave's Botanary
KOL-in-um -- hilly; grows on hills ... Dave's Botanary
commonly known as: hill geranium • Kashmiri (Ladakhi): ལེགཏིན legkatin
Native to: s & s-e Europe towards c Asia, n-w Himalaya
References: Flowers of IndiaFlora of ChinaNPGS / GRIN  
at Valley of Flowers on 02 AUG 12
Very beautiful presentation n very nice flowers :)
I currently cannot put a firm name on this- shall comment further in due course. Further to my recent post about photographing Geraniums.  I am far from certain that the true Geranium collinum is found in the Himalaya. This is a complicated matter. Let me try to explain. It has certainly been thought to in the past. Stewart e.g. listed this species from the Khardong La in his 'The Flora of Ladakh' (1916-17) - I have not seen the pressed specimen but from the altitude and location, I would think this is probably what I understand to be G.regelii. He also listed G.grandiflorum (which is now Geranium himalayense). The images above do not come close to my understanding of either of these species - nor G.pratense subsp. stewartianum a specimen of which I saw near Sonamarg which Peter Yeo at Cambridge identified as this in 1987.  Dickore & Klimes (2005) which is the most up-to-date checklist for Ladakh do not include G.collinum only G. himalayense, pratense, regelii and sibiricum. 
In 'The Valley of Flowers' book G.pratense, collinum, wallichianum and grevilleanum (now G.lambertii) were listed.
In the Notes Yeo supplied me, he draws attention to the problematical G.collinum-pratense-himalayense alliance. He considered this was particularly critical in the NW Himalaya with high quality pressed specimens needed (nowadays these can be supplemented and sometimes replaced by high quality digital images (provided the advice given below is followed). This alliance has pink to blue flowers (sometimes white) in which the stamen-tip and stigmas are never blackish-purple...
I consider it will be helpful for keen photographers, willing to make an additional effort, to know which parts of Geranium to photograph.  Having images of such parts of each geranium will greatly aid identification and enhance our understanding of the genus in the Himalaya - and perhaps you can help with the locating and identification of a species new-to-science!
PHOTOGRAPHING GERANIUMS:

IF only the first one or two flowers have come out don't bother to collect as the form of inflorescence will not be evident.
The rootstock is important; get enough to show whether compact or creeping, or annual.  You can photograph the base of the plant which should provide this information.  Clearly, one requires permission from the authorities to uproot a plant.  There is still  a need and indeed role for the collection of pressed specimens for herbaria in India but that is primarily the domain of staff of botanic gardens/ institutions. 
 In the early stages of flowering look out for the best-developed unripe fruits available. 
 If fruit is ripe try to include both dehisced and undehisced states. 
 If the fruits are falling with the seeds inside them, collect some (many geraniums disperse their seed explosively but some seed is often retained). 
Include some loose petals when pressing (detach if necessary).  Expose stamens to show filament shape and hairs by taking 2 or 3 sepals off a flower from which petals have recently dropped. 
Smoothing out one or two leaves and flowers as you close the press may be helpful; a few separately pressed basal and lower/middle stem leaves are often useful. 
Wilted specimens can be very misleading. 
Notes should be taken as to flower posture, colour and patterning of petals, colour of stigmas, anthers and distal parts of filaments (not necessary if your photos show these). 
And don't forget to ensure the stipules are clearly shown - something that would have been obviously in pressed specimens, so not mentioned above by Yeo.



   
 
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