Uraria lagopodoides

 
India (N) ; Andhra Pradesh; Assam ; Bihar ; Himachal Pradesh; Karnataka ; Kerala ; Madhaya Pradesh; Maharashtra; Manipur; Orissa; Sikkim ; Tamil Nadu; Uttar Pradesh ; West Bengal  & other countries as per ILDIS;

Name of the species: Uraria lagopodioides
Family: Papilionaceae
Place of collection: Ranpur, Nayagarh, Orissa
Habit: Herb
Habitat: Wild, undergrowth of moist deciduous to semi-evergreen forest
Altitude: 300 to 500 m above msl
There are two more Uraria from Orissa which i wl share soon.

Herb from Mizoram.
Bot. Name: Uraria hamosa
Family: Fabaceae

Date/Time- 12-11-2008 / 09:30AM

Location- Mizoram

Habitat- Wild

Plant Habit-  Herb (Diffuse herb), stem hairy

Leaves are trifoliate, elliptic and surface was with dark and light green patches. 


To me appears to be Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC. as per images herein rather than Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl. as per images herein.
Uraria hamosa-050510-PKA1 : 6 posts by 5 authors. Attachments (3)
Herb from Mizoram.
Bot. Name: Uraria hamosa
Family: Fabaceae

Date/Time- 12-11-2008 / 09:30AM

Location- Mizoram

Habitat- Wild

Plant Habit-  Herb (Diffuse herb), stem hairy

Leaves are trifoliate, elliptic and surface was with dark and light green patches.


Very nice flowers................some similarities to Cullen corylifolia(?)
Yes ..., in inflorescence. The leaves here are trifoliate, as against unifoliate in Cullen corylifolia.
To me appears to be Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC. as per images herein rather than Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl. as per images herein.

 
Fabaceae-Faboideae (Papilionaceae) Week :: Uraria hamosa- PKA12: Herb from Mizoram.
Bot. Name: Uraria hamosa
Family: Fabaceae
Habitat: Wild

Plant Habit- Herb (Diffuse herb), stem hairy
Leaves were trifoliate, leaflets elliptic.


To me appears to be Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC. as per images herein.
https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/bd6e0639ab9dd/Uraria%20unid%20gv%20(5).JPG?part=0.4&view=1&vt=ANaJVrEEMuAKNQj2X-aO7mJy3QYwdzGs-i8knw8-lqUoBW2GFwi2sMj6ea2f8SBoPDf-7MhfJfBkObi0bitwrBwJ6oP294jXbBmHaa6HzPJGscR0YkKptmY
https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/bd6e0639ab9dd/Uraria%20unid%20gv%20(4).JPG?part=0.3&view=1&vt=ANaJVrEWbYfsQUGi8P6swuUgTDUPcqWeWluN7DJQbqrF5meKJYJK2eKmkjlaADlp9ONT67npeepKVX_fRwLNWo62f8R4j5VeKTnOmxm-WTxF-Xh-MHsi13A
https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/bd6e0639ab9dd/Uraria%20unid%20gv%20(3).JPG?part=0.2&view=1&vt=ANaJVrGgXz0pRSinaci1p7A45IvBUMP7du3Exf2nagkuVZD-bdXgZ1vrZEe1myuKzvX4pXB8mrO3JHL0N_qnHFHlMGZcMj1YG2P99pBASnxTUl-SpKmLsashttps://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/bd6e0639ab9dd/Uraria%20unid%20gv%20(6).JPG?part=0.5&view=1&vt=ANaJVrE94_IqMSyY5wWV6Bb5i4Y2gao8fN2TcajTu7boExYiMFEl8sOKRFnsUTLyan1i-gYYS4BAWfphpiw0vI1YpLgzNY9H8StRl3uRg4bhEyRjU-UnyFw
Fabaceae (Faboideae) Fortnight :: Uraria for id :: Gori Valley :: NS OCT 126/126
: 4 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (5)
Please suggest id for this herb with glandular inflorescence..
Can this be Uraria lagopus ?
Pics were taken in Gori Valley area..!!
efi page on Uraria lagopus var. neglecta
This is not Uraria lagopus
This is Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl.
To me appears to be Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC. as per images herein rather than Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl. as per images herein.
https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/1380b4e3459554/DSC02462.JPG?part=0.1&view=1&vt=ANaJVrGNKw3IzKqMeJ5sbx2E3rxxR5KzdiUFQpwmo31cK3mil5qXp6JeU_YJge00lOe72jUKLwW0DDkJXii92XXu79L-N1Gwlrnta7x3L7M83PmZmY_k0e4
Fabaceae (Faboideae) Fortnight: Indonesia 7
: 4 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)
What kind of Uraria is it?  Location Kebumen.
Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl.
To me appears to be Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC. as per images herein rather than Uraria rufescens (DC.) Schindl. as per images herein.
https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/2922d808c82e6a5c/DSC00398a.jpg?part=0.1&view=1&vt=ANaJVrFW4pFqx1ItyicxFkiHKaAjrtCYAweDfPQRsRwj9pLZRvbsxQW2QrdV6an8mWmYI7gsF7PUZt5FEKTcRarqer9MybrerWoUJcnOMOnTFErMacHO_L8
 
Like Squirrel Tail: Could you help me ID the following plant please. 
A shrub, ca 1 m tall. Leaves opposite, oblong. Inflorescence like  squirrel tail, whitish. Seeds black. At low altitude (0-60 m asl).

Looks like Uraria crinita, to me.
I guess Uraria alopecuroides
Urararia alopecuroides was earlier under U. lapopus DC. (FBI 2: 156), now  considered as synonym of Uraria lagopodoides (L.) DC
Yes this could be possible as most leaves are simple (rather unifoliate)

What is the rationale behind changing the names of plants without any rhyme or reason. This is such irritant for a layman like me. You fix a name in  your mnd, and suddenly somebody informs yu that the new name is noot XYZ but  XYZ1. Is this the way to maintain the superiority of the subject expert? 
100% agree with you, not only laymen. even plant experts find  it difficult to keep them upto date, what i learned in B.Sc. during field  trips, In M.Sc. i learned that 20% of them were treated as synonym.... 
Everyone will agree that one plant species must have one single name  throughout the World,, so therefore all these exercise is going on.. 
but one thing is good that even the synonyms refer to the same plant  species....

Just showing desperation does not help. I have been teaching my students for  last four decades that correct names of tomato is Lycopersicon esculentum,  and it had in fact been given a seal of stability (we call it nomen
conservandum in technical language). All the three editions of my book had  one full page justifying it, but we find it being named it as Solanum  lycopercum (in fact the oldest name). I had described several new species
and given new names to some, but a few are now changed. I did not get  frustrated because I knew that thousands of researchers all around the world  are working day and night to tell us how much similarity there is between  the plants or which names are to be used based on rules of scientific  naming. Let us be grateful to them for bringing the science to order, and  not show our frustration. No one is trying to show superiority. If updating  information is the show of authority, perhaps it can't be helped. If we want  to remain happy with local names, a safeda to me and you here in warmer  India is Eucalyptus, but Populus for a Kashmiri who has not seen Eucalyptus  in valley. I don't know that Palak that we eat in Delhi and other states is  not Spinach (botanically Spinacea oleracea), it is a variety of beet. Not 5  per cent of Palak sold in Indian markets is Spinach. Whom do we blame for  this, because we call both as Palak. Let us spread knowledge on this group  and not blame others or show our frustration on others
well said and expressed...
my frustration with herbal medicine was the other way around...like in your example of Palak...]
to many regional names in too many books ..authors of which claimed to be experts and if they were also examiners or their pet students were examiners ..that was a terror....
so I am very grateful for the scientific binomials, they have brought some semblance of order... although their work goes on... and on.. to further refinement of classification ...

I have a simple philosophy, go by the current accepted opinion by reputed  website/publication. The scientific opinion keeps on evolving and it it  logical to go by it, rather being bound to fixed ideas.




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