Costus spicatus (Cultivated)

 
Image by Alka Khare (ID by Prabhu Kumar K.M.) & Aarti S. Khale  (Id by J.M.Garg & M. Sabu)
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Costus spicatus
, also known as Spiked Spirlaflag Ginger or Indian Head Ginger, is a species of herbaceous plant in the Costaceae family (also sometimes placed in Zingiberaceae).[1] 
Costus spicatus is native to the Caribbean, (including Dominica, Dominican Republic, Guadeloupe, Martinique, and Puerto Rico).[1][2][3] 
Costus spicatus leaves grow to a length of approximately 1 foot and a width of approximately 4 inches. It produces a short red cone, from which red-orange flowers emerge one at a time.[4]
Costus spicatus will grow in full sun if it is kept moist. It reaches a maximum height of about 6 to 7 feet.[4] 
Costus spicatus can develop a symbiotic partnership with certain species of ants (often only a single species of ant will be compatible). The ants are provided with a food source (nectar in C. spicatus flowers) as well as a place to construct a nest. In turn, the ants protect developing seeds from herbivorous insects.[4] 
(From Wikipedia on 3.9.14)

 
 
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Attached is a picture of Zingiber zerumbet captured at Mumbai in January 2013.
Requested to please validate the ID.
This is probably not Zingiber zerumbet, it should be some species of Costus ?
Yes Costus sp.
It seems the insulin plant Costus igneus.
Thanks ... for the feedback....
C. igneus has yellow flowers. Is it any of Costus woodsonii or C. spicatus?
It is Costus spicatus
 
Araceae, Arecaceae and Zingiberaceae Fortnight: August 1 to 14, 2014 : Costus woodsonii : Mumbai : 300814 : AK-113 : 1 post by 1 author. Attachments (4).  
Pictures taken at Hiranandani Gardens, Powai during TAW in Feb,2014.
It appears like images of Costus spicatus (Cultivated) posted by .... from Mumbai & as identified by ... 
Pl. confirm.
This name was given in the list of Tree Appreciation Walks, where I saw the plant.
Hope to get the correct name validated. 
Yes. He is correct.
Thanks to you and ... for validation. I take it as Costus spicatus?
Yes pl.
   
 
 
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