Chilopsis linearis (USA)


Images by Gurcharan Singh & Ushadi (Inserted by J.M.Garg) (For more photos & complete details, click on the links)

https://08511630493324166816.googlegroups.com/attach/a66c82058fc929d0/Chilopsis-linearis-DSC01933-california-3.jpg?part=0.3&view=1&vt=ANaJVrFSl4EQkP6Bj72CJIPbW4TsuEdpvccjlomNfb_ScjYLjp_VHAFxjh_ClOEj9Qhv12Keibdc8eqPixZkPpAFNXcmcpyG0yhqKx08-Pv9Ae85in2hLbc

 

 
Desert Willow;    
 
Desert Willow, grows in deserts, useful in low water gardening, willow like leaves, but oh so heavenly looking and smelling flowers, hosts many pollinators (I saw many honey bees), 
desert planting experts think it stabilizes soil and is overall very useful as the anchor in dry lands. The bark is very nice too.
A slow growing beauty with graceful carriage has a long season of pink violet flowers and a heavenly scent, increasingly being used in xeriscaping. 
Here it is in a demonstration for appropriate companion planting. There have been similar plantings in various southwestern botanical gardens over the last few decades.
You got one of the parents of my upload of x Chitalpa
Hope some one uploads C. bignonioides.
... you has Catalpa speciosa from California. You may upload it.
 
Bignoniaceae Week: Chilopsis linearis from California:  Thanks ... for prompting me to look for this in my database after your upload. Good I found it.
Chilopsis linearis (Cav.) Sweet, Hort. brit. ed. 1:283. 1826
Syn: Bignonia linearis Cav.; Chilopsis saligna D. Don
Common names: Desert-willow, flowering-willow
Shrub or low deciduous tree up to 6 m tall with slender branches; leaves linear to narrow-lanceolate, 15-30 cm long; flowers in short terminal raceme; corolla 3-5 cm long, lobes crimpled, tube and throat lilac with 2 yellow stripes inside; pod 15-30 cm long, 5-7 mm broad.
Photographed from California
Very nice to see you have close ups of the flowers and even the pods
My older pics are on film and I cant put my hands on them at this point...
I had stayed around by some of these trees ( for a few days in the 90s) and photographed a lot of the pollinators that came... I wish I could find them, even if just to look at myself!!
 
  
 
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