Hericium erinaceus

Hericium erinaceus (Bull.) Pers., 1797 (syn: Clavaria conferta Paulet, 1793; Clavaria erinaceus (Bull.) Paulet, 1793; Dryodon caput-medusae (Bull.) Quél., 1886; Dryodon erinaceus (Bull.) P. Karst., 1882; Dryodon juranus Quél., 1902; Hericium caput-medusae (Bull.) Pers., 1797; Hericium echinus (Scop.) Pers., 1797; Hericium erinaceus f. caput-medusae (Bull.) Nikol., 1950; Hericium erinaceus subsp. erinaceo-abietis Burds., O. K. Mill. & Nishij., 1978; Hericium erinaceus subsp. erinaceus (Bull.) Pers., 1797; Hericium erinaceus var. erinaceus (Bull.) Pers., 1797; Hericium erinaceus var. sulphureum Pers., 1825; Hericium erinaceus subsp. unguiculatum Pers., 1825; Hericium erinaceus var. viridescens Pers., 1825; Hericium grande Raf., 1813; Hericium hystrix Pers., 1797; Hericium unguiculatum (Pers.) Legon & A. Henrici, 2005; Hydnum caput-medusae Bull., 1780; Hydnum echinus (Scop.) Fr., 1821; Hydnum erinaceus Bull., 1781; Hydnum grande (Raf.) Steud., 1824; Hydnum hystricinum Batsch, 1783; Hydnum hystrix (Pers.) Fr., 1821; Hydnum juranum (Quél.) Sacc. & D. Sacc., 1905; Hydnum omasum Panizzi, 1862; Hydnum unguiculatum (Pers.) Streinz, 1861; Manina cordiformis Scop., 1772; Martella echinus Scop., 1770; Martella hystricinum (Batsch) Kuntze, 1898; Martella hystrix (Pers.) Lloyd, 1910; Merisma caput-medusae (Bull.) Spreng., 1827; Merisma hystrix (Pers.) Spreng., 1827; Steccherinum quercinum Gray, 1821);                              


Hericium erinaceus
(also called Lion's Mane Mushroom, Bearded Tooth Mushroom, Satyr's Beard, Bearded Hedgehog Mushroom, pom pom mushroom, or Bearded Tooth Fungus) is an edible and medicinal mushroom belonging to the tooth fungus group. Native to North America, Europe and Asia it can be identified by its long spines (greater than 1 cm length), its appearance on hardwoods and its tendency to grow a single clump of dangling spines.[1] Hericium erinaceus can be mistaken for other species of Hericium, all popular edibles, which grow across the same range. In the wild, these mushrooms are common during late summer and fall on hardwoods, particularly American Beech
Hericium erinaceus is a choice edible when young, and the texture of the cooked mushroom is often compared to seafood. It often appears in Chinese vegetarian cuisine to replace pork or lamb. This mushroom is cultivated commercially on logs or sterilized sawdust and is available fresh or dried in Asian grocery stores.
Hericium erinaceus has long a history of use in traditional Chinese medicine. A 2005 rat study showed some compounds in the mushroom, like threitol, D-arabinitol, and palmitic acid, may have antioxidant effects, regulate blood lipid levels and reduce blood glucose levels.[3] A 2012 study on rats that had suffered brain injury showed that "daily oral administration of H. erinaceus could promote the regeneration of injured rat peroneal nerve in the early stage of recovery."[4]
A report reveals that pills of this mushroom are used in the treatment of gastric ulcers and esophageal carcinoma.[5] And a 2011 study on rats demonstrates the mushroom's wound healing capacities.[6]

Considering the increase of degenerative conditions, scientists around the world have launched investigations on this mushroom possible anti-dementia compounds[citation needed].

Primary research has demonstrated the following:

Long-term safety and effects of withdrawal seem to be unknown.

(From Wikipedia on 13.9.15)



 
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Fwd: [efloraofindia:230882] Himachal KL1 : 4 posts by 1 author.
Here are some beautiful mushrooms/Fungus from Himachal pradesh
Yes it seems to be H. erinaceus (based on the macromorphology).
See the characteristic long spines.
Hericium erinaceus




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