Pityrogramma calomelanos var. aureoflava

Pityrogramma calomelanos var. aureoflava (Hook.) Weath. ex Bailey, Gard. Ferns tab. 50, 1862 (syn: Gymnogramma calomelanos var. aureo-flava Hook.; Pityrogramma austroamericana Domin; Pityrogramma calomelanos var. austroamericana (Domin) Farw.);

Honduras, Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina (Catamarca, Cordoba, Jujuy, Salta, Tucuman), Paraguay (Canindeyu), Guyana, Puerto Rico, Australia (I) (SE-Queensland (I), NE-New South Wales (I)), S-India (I), Sri Lanka (I), Hawaii (I) (Kauai (I), Oahu (I), Molokai (I), Lanai (I), Maui (I), Hawaii Isl. (I)), South Africa (I) (North West (I), Limpopo (I), Mpulamanga (I), KwaZulu-Natal (I), E-Cape Prov. (I)), Swaziland (I), Zambia (I), Tanzania (I), La Runion (I), Mauritius (I) as per Catalogue of Life;


Terrestrial herbs with erect rhizome, 3-5 x 2-3 cm. Scales 4-6 x 0.5-0.9 mm, lanceolate, long acuminate, pale brown. Fronds 20-30 x 5-10 cm, bipinnate; stipe 8-10 cm long, scaly beneath, dark brown polished, grooved above; lamina ovate in outline; pinnae 3-7 x 0.8-1.8 cm, lanceolate, acuminate in outline, progressively reduced towards apex; pinnules 5-10 x 2-3 cm, lanceolate, acute, margins serrate, basal pinnules auricled, progressively reduced towards apex, glabrous above, covered by yellow powder below. Sori acrostichoid when mature. Sporangial capsule 250 x 250 µm, globose, stalk 250 µm long. Spores 50 x 50 µm, dark brown, tetrahedral, trilete, granulose.
Grasslands and evergreen forests along earth cuttings.
(Attributions- K. P. Rajesh as per India Biodiversity Portal)


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Pityrogramma chrysophylla (Sw.) Link SN26420 : 3 posts by 2 authors. Attachments (1)- 4 mb. 
Pityrogramma chrysophylla (Sw.) Link wild terrestrial fern from Western Ghats Tamilnadu.

No - not P. chrysophylla ( see page 272-273 of the Annotated Checklist of Indian Pteridophytes vol. 1. 2016).  I can't see the colour terribly well, but I think it is yellowish, isn't it?  Trouble is that in the effort to preserve specimens from being eaten in Indian herbaria, they are all dipped in alcohol with mercuric chloride - the alcohol washes most of the farina and its flavinoides off.  Or heat-dried - which makes it melt and stick to the paper - so removed.
But this is P. austroamericana - an adventive species from S. America, very common in South India, but does not seem to reach the north as far as I know.


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