Aleuritopteris species

Aleuritopteris species;
 
 
 

Request for ID:  I am attaching three ferns pl identify . These were on the moist shady wall .
the third piture i think is adiantum- Bada hansraj.
The amount of information is insufficient! First we are not told if they are Himalayan (highish? Lowish?) or S. Indian. Secondly the photographer is not aware that it is the BASE of fern fronds that is needed 9 times out of 10, not just the ultimate frond-tips, as obviously the base is the most "developed" or lobed part. Thirdly the picture of the Aleuritopteris has been taken so obliquely that one cannot get a good idea of how long the lowest pinnules on the lowest pinna are.
Then there's the feature special to Aleuritopteris that one has to see the distribution of the scales (and if concolorous or bicolorous) stipe-base only, to stipe apex, up rachis too, or extending onto the pinna-costae and costulates beneath.
I can but hazard an unsatisfactory guess: Aleuritopteris probably bicolor, and obviously Adiantum incisum, presumably subsp. incisum (who knows which subspecies it is).
COULD YOU LET ME KNOW THE PLACE FROM WHERE THESE PICTURES WERE TAKEN ALSO THE ALTITUDE. ALSO KINDLY TAKE PICTURES FROM THE LOWER SURFACE WHICH WILL HELP IN CORRECT IDENTITY, OTHERWISE IT WILL BE JUST GUESS WORK. YOUR LAST PICTURE LOOKS LIKE ADIANTUM INCISUM MIGHT AS WELL BEBA. CAUDATUM. BUT THE FIRST NAME IS CORRECT? ALL ADIANTUMS ARE NOT HANSRAJ. THIS NAME IS GENERALLY APPLIED TO ADIANTUM CAPILLUS VENERIS
BEWARE OF SUCH ANCIENT NAMES. THEY MEAN NOTHING SINCE NO DESCRIPTIONS OR DIAGRAMS OR EVEN THEIR LOCATIONS ARE KNOWN. LEAVE THESE AS MYTHS.
LET US NOT TRY TO GIVE PRESENT NAMES TO THESE EARLIER NAMES. SO MANY PLANTS HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS SANJEEVANI, BUT WHAT WAS IT, NO BODY KNOWS
well said, there is a great problem with attempting to apply Vedic names to species, and it badly affects three quarters of all the ayurvedic medicinal literature. Simply said it is mostly inaccurate in nomenclature, Botanical identity and medicinal knowledge!
Having said that, I believe botanical knowledge might have allowed us to stumble upon the real identity of Sanjjevani (see in the next Indian Fern Journal! - as you know). Only one pteridophyte really fits the distribution pattern - NOT the widespread and common Selaginella bryopteris! But I agree, who's to say it was a pteridophyte - who knows it's not a lichen, such as Shivalit??!! But the Angiosperm candidates are not well supported, even if Shri Randev himself declares it so!

 
 
 
 
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