List of links for online course

In a traditional two-day workshop or class, the teacher presents information.  Much (40-60%) of the class time is spent in presentation.   Then there is some sort of class exercise, which the teacher observes, then corrections are made, information is re-presented by the teacher to answer the FAQs that appear in the classroom.   Finally, homework is issued and the process repeats the next day.   
The second day:  The homework is looked at and areas with frequent errors indicate the need for the teacher to re-re-present the information.  RESULT:  six months later, the participants say, "It was an excellent workshop.  The teacher's presentations were really interesting.    We learned a lot...."  What specifically do we remember?  uh...  well...    I remember I felt at the time that it was a very valuable experience and it changed my perspective.  But I can't remember much besides a diagram that he talked about.   Let me go find that diagram...

In the ACTIVE PARTICIPATION
style of the workshops organized by Will Sutherland, you (the student, the teacher trainee, the participant) are the center.  Before students step into the room, there have been numerous one-on-one contacts between the presenter and the participants.  Most of the presentations take place in videos online, asynchronously, separating the presentation (teaching) and the receiving (listening and learning).  Face-to-face classtime is spent in discussions led by the students/participants.  Short presentations by students might take up ten percent, with frequent interruptions allowed and encouraged to ensure tha the students in the room are activelyinvolved.
Longer lectures by students (to show the depth oftheir insights) become the out of clasroom homework.   Ideally the participants work together when possible in the face to face classroom.   "The students are working together as if the teacher does not exist." (Maria Montessori).   
What is....?   Where do we get....?
1. ASYNCHRONOUS  (separate the presentation and the learning of the information)
2. resources for projects 
3. digital portfolios
4. making free websites (so you can teach others to use wordpress.com and sites google and the google suite of programs)
5. learning through projects and problems
6. lateral thinking
7. transformation of schools
8. use of quotations to alter mindsets
9. biology of the brain and learning

There are other topics...   They will emerge when you, the participant, ask questions.

Let's start by pointing out that the PRESENTERS of this information are EXPERTS because we know some of the things that what we don't know .... this means that we also don't know other parts of what we don't know.
...and we are daily looking for additional bits of information and pieces of psychology.

Perhaps the most important reference is PsychologyToday.com   The magazine/website culls and "popularizes" and makes accessible to the visual brain the leading findings about the brain, mind and learning.

=============================
Let's get started.  This list will be the starting point of our discoveries.   There will be additional points where participants will help this list of links GROW by giving us the links and recommendations.   The best recommendations WITH YOUR REVIEWS will be placed on "ADDITIONAL LINKS" under each category.

1. KEY POINT:  ASYNCHRONOUS  (separate the presentation and the learning of the information)
projects 
http://news.stanford.edu/news/2011/august/online-computer-science-081611.html   NOTE:  This is the landmark course by two professors at Stanford University that has helped shape the direction of this online series of presentations.
Teacher Talking (part 1) (when is the teacher talking needed?)
Teacher Talking (part 2, reset the mindset)  How much of this teacher's talking is really needed?

Two Professors at Stanford

Faculty Collaborate to improve online education
(Stanford)       (Video on YOUTUBE)

ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)



2. resources for projects 
Minimal lecturing.
Wordle.net to create clusters of words
ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)


3. digital portfolios
Example of a student's performance of understanding.  When recorded, this POU becomes part of the student's digital portfolio.
What does Yuzenas say about the ability to make websites?

See the list of digital portfolios at HighTechHigh.org

ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)





4. making free websites (so you can teach others to use wordpress.com and sites google and the google suite of programs)
ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)




5. learning through projects and problems
Examples of projects and problems

ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)




6. lateral thinking
Edward deBono's site  
James Abela's site (English Language teachers know how to stop lecturing)
ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)




7. transformation of schools











8. use of quotations to alter mindsets
Twelve Quotations     Readings from VisualAndActive.com
More quotations (focus on Fischler's commentaries)  
Participants are expected to read and make comments about these quotations.
ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)




9. biology of the brain and learning

James Zull's observations    QUOTATIONS  >>>>>>>   


Vygotsky  Wikipedia article (to start)



ADDITIONAL LINKS (identified by participants)













A teacher is one who makes himself progressively unnecessary. ~ Thomas Carruthers


HOMEWORK
Participants are expected to read and make comments about these quotations.
Find the quotes here
Participants are encouraged to suggest additional quotes (and websites) that can inspire transformation of schools.  

Send your comments to


Videos   
For your convenience and to add some color to this page, these important videos have been displayed as "ready to click" items.

Please nominate other videos that you find useful...


Yuzenas 9 minutes

Most face-to-face classrooms can use this model for how to blend technology and minimal direction and lecturing.



Portfolios

Step by Step with Dennis Yuzenas




More about Portfolios

Quotations part 1 (guidance for teachers)


No more lectures.   No more boring lessons


Quotations part 2 -- What is in the portfolio?
















The quotation that grabbed my attention is on page 127:   I decided to stop lecturing several years ago and my students have been active and engaged in class ever since.  But once in a while i slip back into that lecturing habit, and  the minute I do, my students also slip back into that stupor that made me abandon the  practice in the first place (James Zull)


If learning is change in neuronal networks, that change might not depend on instruction (learning can take place with or without instruction)....Rather than directing and instructing learning, we teachers should give the learner incentives and support in using what she already has in her brain.  She will learn by selecting the right neuronal networks from among those that already exist.    If she begins to fire some new networks, that will come by giving her new experience and showing her new things, not by instruction and explaining.
(page 122)   Zull, James (2002) The fine art of changing the brain:  enriching the practice of teaching by exploring the biology of learning.  Stylus Publishing (2002)





































The story with Shelby Foote and the missing books in the library

Where is that book?