Hamburg 2011‎ > ‎

Participants

Sara Butkovic, University of Guelph, MA European Studies

Julie Chamberlain, University of Toronto, MA Adult Education and Community Development
Julie Chamberlain is a Torontonian. Her relationship with Germany and the German language began with Herr Luke at Woburn Collegiate in Scarborough. With his guidance she began to speak German competitively, which she now finds deliciously absurd. She is currently doing graduate work in Adult Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto and is a coordinator on the Anti-Poverty Community Organizing and Learning research project. She is interested and engaged with issues and theory regarding race, racism, and attitudes towards migrants, and with ideas and practice of "participation" in research and community projects. In her spare time she acts in amateur German theatre productions and dances to Berlin techno.

Lyubava Fartushenko, University of Alberty, MA Design

Michael Grunberg, University of British Columbia, MA German

Ludvic 
Moquin-Beaudry, Université de Montréal
Presently doing my master's degree in philosophy at the Université de Montréal, my main research interests are philosophy of film, cultural production and reproduction, and the relation between politics and culture, from the viewpoints of Critical Theory and French Post-Structuralism. More generally, my academic background lies in political science, history, sociology and philosophy, which makes more akin to a multidisciplinary scholar than a specialized intellectual worker.

My M.A. thesis is about the relation between ideology and film in the Frankfurt School, especially in Walter Benjamin, Theodor W. Adorno, and Siegfried Kracauer. All three thinkers have also been hard to categorize, with works ranging from musical composition to film criticism and essays about urbanity, 19th Century French literature, modernity, and historical materialism among others. I strongly feel the need to reassert the role of general theory today, as over-specialization tends to make us forget the social, political, cultural horizon that lies beyond the immediate research interests and that precedes and determines them as well.

Paul Mikols, Wilfrid Laurier University Waterloo, MBA

Sophia Muller, University of Ottawa, PhD Political Studie

Tara Smedbøl, University of Waterloo, MA Economics and German

Lori Steuart, University of Victoria, MA English
Ann Vandergust, University of Guelph, MSc Chemistry

Louis-Philippe Vien, Université de Montréal, MA Sciences Politiques

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