11 Points for Labor



Do a search on the Internet for "11 points for labor Deming" and the first entry is Dr. Gitlow's book.


Gitlow, H. and Gitlow, S., 
The Deming Guide to Quality and Competitive Position, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey, 1987, 15th printing.   

Here is a brief description:   
This book is a practical how-to guide to improving quality, productivity, and competitive position in any type of organization. It is based on the philosophy of Dr. W. Edwards Deming, the man largely responsible for the success of Japanese industry. It is a clear, concise approach that brings the methods of Dr. Deming to the reader in an understandable form. Many examples are provided to make learning the philosophy easier. The authors present Dr. Deming’s 14 points for management, including questions for self-examination, ideas for action, and potential pitfalls. Also presented are labor’s corollary eleven points which integrate management’s and labor’s efforts for organizational health and prosperity.

(reproduced from Dr. Gitlow's website)


Buy this book on Allibris


Here is what the search yielded on Google (search on 19 March 2011)

  1. Dr Gitlow author, Dr Gitlow books

     - 4:44am
    It is based on the philosophy of Dr. W. Edwards Deming
    the man largely responsible ... Also presented are labor's 
    corollary eleven points which integrate ...
    www.howardgitlow.com/howardgitlowbooks.htm - Cached - Similar
  2. DQ Point 11: Eliminate Numerical Quotas

    Here I describe Deming's quality point 11, "Eliminate Numerical 
    Quotas," a requirement for enabling sustainable data quality 
    improvement. Like what you see ? ...
    www.information-management.com/issues/.../217-1.html r
  3. 14 POINTS (By: Edward Deming)

    Deming's approach is summed up in his famous 14 Points... 
    Point 11: Eliminate work standards that prescribe numerical 
    quotas for the workforce and ...
    www.1000advices.com/.../quality_tqm_14points_deming.html - 
  4. Deming's Point #11 as Applied to the Insurance Industry

    John Pryor examines Dr. Edwards Deming's Point #11
    Eliminate numerical quotas for ...Although it has nothing 
    directly to do with Point #11 and system or ...
    www.irmi.com › ... › Continuous Performance Improvement 
  5. Business Statistics: Contemporary Decision Making - Google Books Result

    Ken Black - 2009 - Business & Economics - 836 pages
    Deming's 14 Points Deming listed 14 points which, if followed, ... Management and laborshould be constantly on the lookout for ways to improve the product. ...
    books.google.com/books?isbn=0470409010...
  6. 7 Deadly Diseases

    W. Edwards Deming's Fourteen Points and. Seven Deadly 
    Diseases of Management. W. Edward Deming is generally ..... 
    11a. Eliminate work standards (quotas) on the factory floor..... 
    What percent of your labor costs is for medical care? ...
    www.endsoftheearth.com/Deming14Pts.htm - Cached - Similar
  7. Theory Z - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Deming's theories are summarized in his two books, Out of 
    the Crisis and The New ... He also points out; however, that 
    management sometimes has a tendency to underestimate the... 
    cultures and overseeing movements of jobs to countries with l
    ow-cost labor... 11). New York: McGraw- Hill. Luthans, Fred. (1989)
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theory_Z - Cached - Similar




So you see:  the Internet turns to Dr. Gitlow when the 11 points for labor are sought.





We believe that there are two cores of resistance to Deming's principles:  management (25%) and labor (75%).   Yes, there are managers who don't embrace the idea of constant improvement, but in general there is a widely accepted notion that there must be improved productivity.     The focus ought to be more on improving quality, which will eventually improve productivity, but that is a matter for a separate analysis (Productivity or Quality?)

Within the teaching profession, the resistance to Deming from teachers is at least three times stronger than resistance from managers.   See the analysis below.  The numbers are not based on actual surveys.  The numbers show relative strength of accepting the Deming principle.

 Category        Typical public school     Some charter schools Many teachers 
1 Constant purpose 0.5 0.7 0.2
2 Adopt a new philosophy   
    
 4  price tag 0.2 0.8
Charters tend to be guided by the market
 0.2
 5 improve constantly 0.2  some reforms 0.7  good charters adapt to the market 0.2 stay within the contract
 6  training on the job (OTJ) 0.2 union rules give managers few chances to see how teachers actually perform, so OTJ training is less likely 0.8  random observations lead to suggestions for improvement 0.2 some teachers don't embrace unplanned observations
 7 Institute leadership 0.3 Although some public schools ask for innovation, most "focus on getting the kids through the test" (schools are often judged on results of high-stakes tests) 0.7  The strength of charter managers is the more-flexible targets that charters set forthemselves. 0.1  Teachers are generally reactive, not proactive.  "Wait until they tell us what to do."  Much teaching is directed toward passing a test.
 8 Drive out fear 0.2  Fear of charters and competition from online schools and home schooling drives public schools 0.6  Fear of losing the contract is balanced with flexible work rules 0.1  Fear is the governing (paralyzing) force in work as a teacher
 9 Break down barriers 0.2  Some innovation is creeping in, but union contracts quash most expansive job descriptions 0.8  Charter managers require teachers to be flexible.   0  It is rare to see a teacher in public school that goes beyond the job description.
 10  eliminate targets and quotas 0.2  The aim is to get the "A" rating.  Targets are set in the school's improvement plan 0.6  Many charters embrace new ways, aiming to  0.2  Most teachers will point to the students' demographics as a source of the poor performance.
 11 remove quotas 0.2  Management by numbers 0.5  many charters have a flexible approach to  0.2  many teachers work to the target or quota that is given to them.
 12    
 13    
 14    
 Sums   
 Ratio of acceptance Management to Labor   

This model was created to give the reader an idea about how charter schools might appear to compare with traditional public schools.  The ratings are based on anecdotes collected form teachers and administrators.


Return to HOME
Deming's 11 Points for Labor

(listed with the approval of Dr. Gitlow)



1.  Absorb and live the company's mission, goals and operating philosophy.

2.  Look toward the long-term good of the firm, not solely toward short-term gains for labor.  Consider the needs of investor, directors, management, customers, vendors and the community through your union.

3.  Show genuine concern for the constant improvement of quality.  expand quality consciousness.

4.  Communicate ideas to management concerning new products and services, better raw materials, better production methods and training, cost reduction, and reduction of waste.  Ideas from labor are essential;  however, action is the responsibility of management.

5.  Report conditions that rob you of your pride of workmanship to management.

6.  Know exactly what your job is and strive for improvement.  Embrace "constructive" job-knowledge testing and job-performance measurements as aids to continual improvement.

7.  Reject both penalties and payments for defective output due to deficiencies in the system.  Consider the long-term effects.

8.  Do not demand and create stultifying seniority and work rules.  Ignore job boundaries which inhibit helping others.

9.  Avoid adversarial and competitive behavior between and within shifts and departments, or with management.  Act as part of a team for the common good of all.

10.  Request and attend training programs.  An elementary grasp of statistical concepts is very important.

11.  Cooperate with management in creating a structure that will push the above points every day.



Commentary:   Perhaps these key points should be studied more than the 14 points?   If labor brings these points to the negotiating table, would management respond positively?


page 208
The Deming Guide to Quality and Competitive Position
Howard S. Gitlow
Shelly J. Gitlow
Prentice-Hall, Englewood CLiffs. NJ  1987

To contact Dr. Gitlow, click here











Article


Teachers can lead the push for better schools with Deming's Eleven Points for Labor


By Steve McCrea


Anyone familiar with the Total Quality movement and the success of Japan in producing high-quality goods will know something about W. Edwards Deming.  The man who brought quality consciousness to Japan in the 1950s created his famous "Fourteen Points" (search wikipedia to find the list), which appears in any book about about Deming's philosophy.


Many people who use Deming's approach usually approach management with a to-do list, including "Drive out fear" (Deming's point number 8).  A quick search of "Deming 11 points for labor" gives a book by Howard and Shelly Gitlow, listing eleven points that labor can adopt.   One of the key aspects affecting the dynamics of many labor-management negotiations is an element of distrust.   Many fans of Deming's work decry the opportunities that managers miss by not using Dmeing's 14 points to guide contract talks.  A close reading of Gitlow's work unveils a clear path to unblocking a stalemate:  Let labor lead with a commitment to quality.


Teachers' unions would be better served, in general, by union bosses who might be more flexible.    A famous video clip (shown in Robert Compton's documentary found at 2mminutes.com) shows a union president recommending that children get "their own union, because I will represent the rights of teachers."   Where's the big picture?   Are schools in place to give teachers jobs?


In my work as a teacher at a charter school, management is constantly asking for our ideas to improve the system.   Charter schools by their nature aim to streamline procedures, thereby cutting costs and improving value.    Some of my colleagues bring with them the common attitude of teachers in the traditional public school system:  "THEY asked us to do more without asking for pay.   Where is a union when you need one?"   


That's right, most charter schools negotiate one-on-one with each employee.   We have year-to-year contracts and we can be terminated at any time.   I like the system, in part because I used to own a language school where most teachers are paid by the hour as independent contractors.   As a teacher-owner, I had a look at the big picture (the health of the organization and the needs of our clients) as well as the details (the company's profits, the working conditions of teachers). 


The following excerpts from the Deming list of 11 points for labor are particularly appropriate for "teachers who act like owners":


Ignore job boundaries which inhibit helping others (point 8).


Consider the long-term effects  (point 7).


Act as part of a team for the common good of all (point 9).


In short, teachers of the future will do well to consider looking at their role in schools the way factory workers might see their place in the assembly line.   They are part of the system and part of the solution.




Appendix

Here is the complete list of "Labor's Eleven Pints" as it appears on page 208 in The Deming Guide to Quality and Competitive Position by Howard S. Gitlow and Shelly J. Gitlow  (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs. NJ, 1987).



1.  Absorb and live the company's mission, goals and operating philosophy.


2.  Look toward the long-term good of the firm, not solely toward short-term gains for labor.  Consider the needs of investor, directors, management, customers, vendors and the community through your union.


3.  Show genuine concern for the constant improvement of quality.  expand quality consciousness.


4.  Communicate ideas to management concerning new products and services, better raw materials, better production methods and training, cost reduction, and reduction of waste.  Ideas from labor are essential;  however, action is the responsibility of management.


5.  Report conditions that rob you of your pride of workmanship to management.


6.  Know exactly what your job is and strive for improvement.  Embrace "constructive" job-knowledge testing and job-performance measurements as aids to continual improvement.


7.  Reject both penalties and payments for defective output due to deficiencies in the system.  Consider the long-term effects.


8.  Do not demand and create stultifying seniority and work rules.  Ignore job boundaries which inhibit helping others.


9.  Avoid adversarial and competitive behavior between and within shifts and departments, or with management.  Act as part of a team for the common good of all.


10.  Request and attend training programs.  An elementary grasp of statistical concepts is very important.


11.  Cooperate with management in creating a structure that will push the above points every day.


For more information, see Dr. Gitlow's website www.howardgitlow.com



Steve McCrea (author) and Abdul Rahman Almufti are partners in BuildtheFuture.net, a consulting group.


This article also appears on Scribd.com  








































































The 14 Points

  1. Create constancy of purpose toward improvement of product and service, with the aim to become competitive and stay in business, and to provide jobs.
  2. Adopt the new philosophy. We are in a new economic age. Western management must awaken to the challenge, must learn their responsibilities, and take on leadership for change.
  3. Cease dependence on inspection to achieve quality. Eliminate the need for massive inspection by building quality into the product in the first place.
  4. End the practice of awarding business on the basis of price tag. Instead, minimize total cost. Move towards a single supplier for any one item, on a long-term relationship of loyalty and trust.
  5. Improve constantly and forever the system of production and service, to improve quality and productivity, and thus constantly decrease costs.
  6. Institute training on the job.
  7. Institute leadership (see Point 12 and Ch. 8 of "Out of the Crisis"). The aim of supervision should be to help people and machines and gadgets to do a better job. Supervision of management is in need of overhaul, as well as supervision of production workers.
  8. Drive out fear, so that everyone may work effectively for the company. (See Ch. 3 of "Out of the Crisis")
  9. Break down barriers between departments. People in research, design, sales, and production must work as a team, to foresee problems of production and in use that may be encountered with the product or service.
  10. Eliminate slogans, exhortations, and targets for the work force asking for zero defects and new levels of productivity. Such exhortations only create adversarial relationships, as the bulk of the causes of low quality and low productivity belong to the system and thus lie beyond the power of the work force.
  11. a. Eliminate work standards (quotas) on the factory floor. Substitute leadership.
    b. Eliminate management by objective. Eliminate management by numbers, numerical goals. Substitute leadership.
  12. a. Remove barriers that rob the hourly worker of his right to pride of workmanship. The responsibility of supervisors must be changed from sheer numbers to quality.
    b. Remove barriers that rob people in management and in engineering of their right to pride of workmanship. This means, inter alia," abolishment of the annual or merit rating and of management by objective (See Ch. 3 of "Out of the Crisis").
  13. Institute a vigorous program of education and self-improvement.
  14. Put everybody in the company to work to accomplish the transformation. The transformation is everybody's job.
















Comments