Old and rare Photos of Bihar

Please click on the following blue coloured  links to view the Old and rare Photographs of Bihar-

Photographer: Unknown Date: 1872
Photograph from the Crofton Collection: 'Public works including the Manora Breakwater and the River Son canal system' taken in 1873. The Dhodand Quarries, Bihar were exploited for Kaimur sandstone, a very durable building material. The sandstone occurs in escarpments that overlook the Son River and cliffs along the Ganges. It was quarried at Dhodand before being conveyed by railway to Dehri to be utilised in works connected with the Son Canals in the 1870s.
Principal street of Gaya.
Photographer: Unknown ,Date: 1895
View of a busy street in Gaya, Bihar from the Elgin Collection: 'Spring Tours 1894-98', taken in 1895. According to legend, a demon called Gaya, appalled by the sorrow caused by death, died for the world as a protest. Vishnu was so impressed with this sacrifice that he bestowed upon Gaya the power to absolve sinners. The well known Vishnupad temple, which is supposed to be built on Vishnu's footprint, is in the centre of the town.Photographer: Garrick, Henry Baily Wade, Date: 1881
Photograph of a ruined temple at Deo Baranark, taken by Henry Baily Wade Garrick in 1881-82. Temple A, which is shown to the left of this photograph is described by A. Cunningham in the Report of tours in North and South Bihar in 1880-81 (A.S.I. vol. XVI, Calcutta, 1883) pp.68-69
Types of Engines - First 1854. - Latest 1897 [Jamalpur Railway Workshops].
Photographer: Unknown, Date: 1897
The locomotive on the right is an earlier, smaller type (named Multum in Parvo on the wheel casing), the one on the left, numbered 223 is a later one. This view was taken at the Jamalpur Railway Workshops in north-east India by an unknown photographer, c. 1897 from the Elgin Collection: 'Presented to His Excellency the Earl of Elgin & Kincardine...

Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1872

Photograph of the Lilajan River and Jaru in the Barabar Hills in Bihar, taken by Joseph David Beglar in 1872-73. The Barabar and Nagarjuni Hills, which are situated close to one another, contain seven cave-temples. The earliest of these have been both architecturally and epigraphically dated to around 250 BC
The Visit of His Excellency The Earl of Elgin & Kincardine...to the East Indian Railway Workshops at Jamalpur. December 3rd 1897
Photographer: Elias, Basil J .Medium: Photographic print Date: 1897
View showing the Viceregal party at the East Indian Railway Workshops, Jamalpur taken by Basil J. Elias, December 1897 from the Elgin Collection: 'Presented to His Excellency the Earl of Elgin & Kincardine...as a Memento of His Excellency's Visit to the East Indian Railway Workshops at Jamalpur November 30th 1897'

Photographer: Garrick, Henry Baily Wade, Date: 1880

The pillar is photographed still standing in the whole from which the bottom quarter was excavated. It is reproduced as a lithograph in Alexander Cunningham, Report of tours in North and South Bihar in 1880-81 (A.S.I. vol. XVI, Calcutta, 1883), pl. xxiv and described pp. 65-67 as "a very curious monolith". The description continues: "...its sculptures point to a period when the older gods Indra, Kuvera, Varuna, and Yama were still objects of worship.
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General view of ruined temple, Mandaur, Gaya District

Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1875

Photograph of the ruined temple at Mandaur, Gaya District, Concerning Mandaur, the Bengal list reads, ''The ruins here, six miles north of Gaya on the Phalgu River, consist of a temple of which some pillars are still standing, and some very fine pieces of sculpture. The pillars and architraves are in a dangerous state, and something ought to be done to prevent a collapse and the destruction of what exists...Some of the sculptures are excellent and deserve preservation.''
 Annicut. Baroon shore under sluices, annicut in distance
Photographer: Unknown, Date: 1872
Photograph from the Crofton Collection: 'Public works including the Manora Breakwater and the River Son canal system' taken in 1872. . An annicut, or weir was built on the Son between 1869 and 1875 by constructing a mass of rubble stone masonry founded on shallow wells. It is 12,469 feet long and consists of scouring sluices positioned at each flank which are fitted with gates which can be opened or closed.Photographer: Unknown , Date: 1895
Distant view of the church from across the maidan at Gaya, Bihar, from the Elgin Collection: 'Spring Tours 1894-98', taken in c.1895 from   Elgin Albums, from Lord Elgin's arrival in Calcutta in 1894 to the arrival of his successor Lord Curzon and his own departure in 1899. Most of the photographs  are of his  visit to Gaya in Spring 1895 and to Buxar in January 1896.This is a view of the church from across the maidan with the Brahmajuni hills in the distance.Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1872
Photograph of a statue of a Bodhisattva from Jamui, Monghyr (Munger) District, Bihar, taken by Joseph David Beglar in 1871-72. Situated near the town of Jamui, the remains of the Buddhist centre of Indapairgah date to the seventh-century. The principal monument found here is a large stupa, 125 feet in diameter and 35 feet in height.
Old ruined gate of the fort, Biharsharif
Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1875
Photograph of the old ruined gate of the fort at Bihar Sharif in Bihar, taken by Joseph David Beglar in the 1870s. The List of Ancient Monuments in Bengal (1896) pp. 256-257 describes the fort: "The wall appears to have been 18 feet thick and 30 feet high, and the base of the rampart is 60 feet wide. The diameter is considerable, as the circumference is 8,500 feet. The distance from the north to the south gate is 2,800 feet, and from the east to the west gate 2,100 feet
.The Vishnupud Temple, Gaya, with Gaywal priests.
Photographer: Unknown,Date: 1895
View of the Vishnupad temple situated on the west bank of the underground river, Falgu at Gaya in Bihar, from the Elgin Collection: 'Spring Tours 1894-98', taken in 1895. The temple was renovated in 1787 by Rani Ahalya Bai. This is a very holy site where Hindus offer pind or oblations for their deceased ancestors.
Distant view of Sher Shah Suri's Tomb, with surroundings, Sasaram
Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1870
This view of the tomb of Sher Shah Suri and its surroundings at Sasaram was taken by J D Beglar in the 1870s for the Archaeological Survey of India. It predates the extensive restoration project of the mausoleum undertaken by Beglar in 1882-83. Photographer: Unknown Date: 1873
Photograph from the Crofton Collection: 'Public works including the Manora Breakwater and the River Son canal system' taken in 1873. The Grand Trunk Road passed through Shahabad from south-east to north-west and was constructed between 1861 and 1862. Construction of the bridge took place as part of the Son Canal system works, an irrigation project to combat famine in an area dependent upon agriculture. Initiated by Colonel C.H. Dickens in 1853
Rock sculptures at foot of Kauwa Dol Hill, Gaya District
Photographer: Beglar, Joseph David, Date: 1875
Photograph of Hindu and Buddhist sculptures carved in niches on massive boulders at the foot of the Kauwa Dol Hill, Gaya District, taken by Joseph David Beglar in the 1870s. In their report of tours of 1880-81, Alexander Cunningham wrote, "Kauwa-dol, or the 'Crow's Rocking Stone', is the name of a tall perpendicular rock on the top of a bluff granite peak about 500 feet high...Kauwa-dol has been identified by Mr. Beglar.

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