Apple Macintosh II serie

Wish-list
  • Macintosh IIx

Models

Unlike prior Macintosh models, which were all compact all-in-one designs, the Macintosh II models were "modular" systems which did not include built-in monitors and were expandable. Beginning with the Macintosh II and culminating in the Macintosh IIfx, the Mac II series was Apple Computer's high-end line from 1987 until the introduction of the Motorola 68040-based Macintosh Quadra computers in 1991.

The II series introduced NuBus which would become the standard expansion bus for the entire Macintosh line for almost a decade. The Mac II models were the first to support color displays and display resolutions larger than the 512×342 of the compact Macintosh design.

The Mac II series were the first Macintosh models to use a Motorola 68000 series processor other than the Motorola 68000. Except for the original Mac II which launched the line with a 68020 clocked at 16 MHz, they exclusively used the Motorola 68030 microprocessor, even after the Motorola 68040 was introduced. Apple would eventually adopt the '040 with the introduction of the Quadra 700 and 900, positioning these models as high-end workstation-class machines for graphics and scientific computing, while continuing to release Mac II-series models as mainstream desktop computers.

During the Macintosh II series' lifespan, they rose to become among the most powerful personal computers available. The Macintosh II was later surpassed by the Macintosh Quadra series. The Macintosh LC and Performa lines continued the II's 68030 technology long after the 68040 was introduced and the PowerBook continued to use the '030 into the Power Macintosh era.

Source: Wikipedia

Apple Macintosh II

Apple Macintosh II (Original)

Apple Macintosh II (Original)
The Apple Macintosh II features a 16 MHz 68020 processor, a 68881 FPU, 1 MB or 4 MB of RAM, a 40 MB or an 80 MB hard drive, and the option of an Apple Macintosh II video card in a large, easy-to-open desktop case.

The Macintosh II was nicknamed the "Open Mac" because of its 6 NuBus slots which made expansion and customization easy. The Macintosh II also was the first color-capable Macintosh and set a new standard for color in the computer industry by supporting true color (16.7 million colors) courtesy of the new Color QuickDraw language in ROM.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The "corporate" Snow White of the SE is shared by the Macintosh II, which departs even more from Jobs' vision of friendly design to embrace instead the standard set by IBM. It is a large rectangular box, even bigger and offering more expandability than the PCs it resembles. It has six expansion slots indicated by a row of removable plastic pieces on its back, as well as having room for two floppy drives and an internal hard drive (see technical specifications). Its case has the same base of vertical lines that is found on the SE, and it is similarly recessed from the front to provide a small space for the keyboard and to provide its only visual link to the original Macintosh. A thick line stretches over the front bezel just over an inch from its top, a recession like those on the SE which hides the floppy disk slots. Below this line, there is a deep break in the plastic wrapping around to the back of the machine in order to emphasize the removable top of the case into which the user has easy access. Snow White lines run over the top of the case, breaking into the plastic for venting, though a large rectangular vent is found undisguised over the ports on the back.

The design of the Macintosh II is authoritative and very formal. Though elegant and simple, it generates a sense of power with its almost monumental width and length. "If the original Mac was a canoe and a paddle," Stephen Peart said, "the Mac II was a nuclear-powered battleship" (Kunkel, 53). It is a very successful design, suggesting the performance and corporate identity that Apple strived for in following the design of IBM's PC, while still expressing the simplicity and elegance of the original Macintosh. Apple's advertising reflects this image, comparing their computers to cars - other high performance and high value items (many of which were not much more expensive) (e.g. Apple ad in MacWorld, May 1989, 2 pages inserted between p. 82 and 83). The case continued to be used for two later machines, the IIx in September 1988 (see technical specifications) and the IIfx in March 1990 (see technical specifications).

Source: Apple and the History of Personal Computer Design

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000173 F8230WGM5000 -
H0000174 F830104M5000 -
H0000176 F7216KVM5030 -
H0000177 F8043C8M5030 -
History
Two common criticisms of the Macintosh from its introduction in 1984 were the closed architecture and lack of color; rumors of a color Macintosh began almost immediately.

The Macintosh II project was begun by Dhuey and Berkeley during 1985 without the knowledge of Apple co-founder and Macintosh division head Steve Jobs, who opposed features like expansion slots and color, on the basis that the former complicated the user experience and the latter did not conform to WYSIWYG, since color printers were not common. Initially referred to as "Little Big Mac", it was codenamed "Milwaukee" after Dhuey's hometown, and later went through a series of new names, including "Reno", "Uzi" and "Paris" (after Jean-Louis Gassee, Apple's then products manager, who protected the semi-clandestine project from cancellation). After Jobs was fired from Apple in September 1985, the project could proceed openly.

Introduced in March 1987 and retailing for US $5,498, the Macintosh II was the first "modular" Macintosh model, so called because it came in a horizontal desktop case like many IBM PC compatibles of the time. All previous Macintosh computers used an all-in-one design with a built-in black-and-white CRT.

The Macintosh II had drive bays for an internal hard disk (originally 40 MB or 80 MB) and an optional second floppy disk drive. It, along with the Macintosh SE, was the first Macintosh computer to use the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) introduced with the Apple IIGS for keyboard and mouse interface.

The primary improvement in the Mac II was Color QuickDraw in ROM, a color version of the graphics language which was the heart of the machine. Among the many innovations in Color QuickDraw were an ability to handle any display size, up to 8-bit color depth, and multiple monitors. Because Color QuickDraw was included in the Mac II's ROM and relied on new 68020 instructions, earlier Macintoshes could not be upgraded to display color.
Features
The Mac II featured a Motorola 68020 processor operating at 16 MHz teamed with a Motorola 68881 floating point unit. The machine shipped with a socket for an MMU, but the "Apple HMMU Chip" (VLSI VI475 chip) was installed that did not implement virtual memory (instead, it translated 24-bit addresses to 32-bit addresses for the Mac OS, which was not 32-bit clean until System 7). Standard memory was 1 megabyte, expandable to 8 MB. The Mac II had eight 30-pin SIMMs, and memory was installed in groups of four (called "Bank A" and "Bank B"). A 5.25-inch 40 MB internal SCSI hard disk was optional, as was a second internal 800 kilobyte 3.5-inch floppy disk drive. Six NuBus slots were available for expansion (at least one of which had to be used for a graphics card, as the Mac II had no onboard graphics chipset and the OS didn't support headless booting). It is possible to connect as many as six displays to a Macintosh II by filling all of the NuBus slots with graphics cards. Another option for expansion included the Mac286, which included an Intel 80286 chip and could be used for MS-DOS emulation.

The original ROMs in the Macintosh II contained a bug which prevented the system from recognizing more than one megabyte of memory address space on a Nubus card. Every Macintosh II manufactured up until about November 1987 had this defect. This happened because Slot Manager was not 32-bit clean. Apple offered a well-publicized recall of the faulty ROMs and released a program to test whether a particular Macintosh II had the defect. As a result, it is rare to find a Macintosh II with the original ROMs.

The Macintosh II and Macintosh SE were the first Apple computers since the Apple I to be sold without a keyboard. Instead the customer was offered the choice of the new ADB Apple Keyboard or the Apple Extended Keyboard as a separate purchase. Dealers could bundle a third-party keyboard or attempt to upsell a customer to the more expensive (and higher-profit) Extended Keyboard.

The Macintosh II was followed by a series of related models including the Macintosh IIx and Macintosh IIfx, all of which used the Motorola 68030 processor. It was possible to upgrade a Macintosh II to a Macintosh IIx or IIfx with a motherboard swap. The Macintosh II was the first Macintosh to have the Chimes of Death accompany the Sad Mac logo whenever a serious hardware error occurred.

The new extensions featured for the Macintosh II at the time were A/ROSE and Sound Manager.
Graphics card
The card was unaccelerated, but it had a 16.7 million color palette (true color). It supported two resolutions, 512×384 and 640×480 (supporting Apple's fixed-resolution 12" and 13" color monitors respectively) and was available in two configurations, 4-bit and 8-bit. The 4-bit model supports 16 colors on a 640×480 display, 256 colors (8-bit video) on a 512×384 display, which means that VRAM was 256 KB. The 8-bit model supports 8-bit/256-color video on a 640×480 display, which means that VRAM was 512 KB in size. With an optional RAM upgrade (requires eight 120 ns DIP chips), the 4-bit version supports 640×480 in 8-bit color.
Memory limit
The original Macintosh II did not have a PMMU by default. It relied on the memory controller hardware to map the installed memory into a contiguous address space. This hardware had the restriction that the address space dedicated to bank A must be larger than those of bank B. Though this memory controller was designed to support up to 16MB 30-pin SIMMs for up to 128MB of RAM, the original Macintosh II ROMs had problems limiting the amount of RAM that can be installed to 8MB. The Macintosh IIx ROMs that also shipped with the FDHD upgrade fixed this problem, though still do not have a 32-bit Memory Manager and cannot boot into 32-bit addressing mode under Mac OS (without the assistance of MODE32). MODE32 contained a workaround that allowed larger SIMMs to be put in Bank B with the PMMU installed. In this case, the ROMs at boot think that the computer has 8MB or less of RAM. MODE32 then reprograms the memory controller to dedicate more address space to Bank A, allowing the additional memory in Bank B to be accessed. Since after that the physical address space is not contiguous, the PMMU is then use to remap the address space into a contiguous block.

Source: Wikipedia

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: March 2, 1987
Discontinued Date: January 15, 1990
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1987.
Processor Speed: 16 MHz
Processor Type: 68020
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68881
System Bus Speed: 16 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 256k
  • The Macintosh II ROM is "32-bit dirty."
L1 Cache: 0.25k
L2 Cache: N/A
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 120 ns
  • PAL SIMMs required for 4 MB and larger capacities.
Standard RAM: 1 MB, 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 128 MB
  • The ROM Is "32-bit dirty" and by default, the Macintosh II with its original ROM only supports 8 MB of RAM (1 MB SIMMs in each of eight slots). With the FDHD upgrade kit, the system is capable of supporting 68 MB of RAM (1 MB SIMMs in bank A and 16 MB SIMMs in bank B). Finally, with 32-bit addressing and the MODE32 system extension this model is capable of supporting 128 MB of RAM (16 MB SIMMs in all eight slots).

    Also see: Actual Max RAM of All G3 & Later Macs.
Motherboard RAM: None
RAM Slots: 8
  • RAM SIMMs must be installed in groups of four.
Video Card: Video Card
VRAM Type: Video Card
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh II had either 256k or 512k of VRAM and supported multiple resolutions.
Standard VRAM: 256k, 512k
Maximum VRAM: 256k, 512k
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh II had 256k or 512k of VRAM, but numerous third-party video cards also were available.
Display Support: Up to 6 Displays
Resolution Support: 512x384, 640x480
  • The Macintosh II can support multiple displays -- originally at great cost -- using multiple video cards in NuBus expansion slots. The Macintosh II also can support multiple resolutions, 512x384 and 640x480 are common. Portrait (vertical orientation) displays also were popular.
2nd Display Support: Dual/Mirroring
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • The Macintosh II can support multiple displays with multiple video cards.
Standard Hard Drive: 40 MB, 80 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • By default, the Macintosh II was offered with either a 40 MB or an 80 MB 5.25" internal SCSI hard drive.
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 800k x2 (Auto)
  • Second floppy drive optional. The Macintosh II FDHD upgrade provided a 1.44 MB disk drive as well as Macintosh IIx ROMs for higher memory capacity.
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 6 NuBus
Expansion Bays: None
  • There are no free expansion bays with dual disk drives and one 5.25" hard drive installed. Third-party products were available to install additional and other storage options.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh II
Apple Order No: M5333
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh II
  • M5333 refers to a configuration with 1 MB of RAM and a single 800k floppy disk drive. Configured with 1 MB of RAM, an 800k floppy drive and a 40 MB hard drive is order number M5430, and configured with 4 MB of RAM, an 800k floppy drive, and a 40 MB hard drive is order number M5410.
Apple Model No: M5000
Gestalt ID: 6
  • Also see: All Macs with the M5000 Model Number and 6 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium x2
Battery Life: N/A
  • The Macintosh II has two 3.6V Lithium batteries soldered to the motherboard.
Original Mac OS: 2.0
Supported Mac OS: 2.0-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.5.5
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.4
Avg. Weight: 24.0 lbs (10.9 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (14 cm, 47.5 cm, 36.6 cm).
Original Price (US): US$5500
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIx

Apple Macintosh IIx The Apple Macintosh IIx features a 16 MHz 68030 processor, a 68882 FPU, 1 MB or 4 MB of RAM, a 40 MB or an 80 MB hard drive, and the option of an Apple Macintosh II video card in an easy-to-expand desktop case.

The Macintosh IIx uses the same "Open Mac" case as the Macintosh II, but shipped standard with a faster processor and a faster FPU -- it was the first Mac to ship with the 68030 processor and the 68882 FPU -- as well as dual 1.44 MB disk drives. It also requires significantly less "tinkering" to upgrade the RAM and other internal components.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIx was introduced by Apple Computer in 1988 as an incremental update of the original Macintosh II model. It replaced the 16 MHz Motorola 68020 CPU and 68881 FPU of the II with a 68030 CPU and 68882 FPU running at the same clock speed; and the 800 KB floppy drive with the 1.44 MB SuperDrive (the first Mac to have this feature). The initial price of the IIx was US$7,769 (equivalent to $15,733 in 2016) or US$9,369 (equivalent to $18,973 in 2016) for a version with the 40 MB hard drive.

The Mac IIx included 0.25 KiB of L1 instruction CPU cache, 0.25 KiB of L1 data cache, a 16 MHz bus (1:1 with CPU speed), and supported up to System 7.5.5.

The IIx was the second of three Macintosh models to use this case allowing dual floppy drives and 6 NuBus slots; the last model was the Macintosh IIfx. Apple's nomenclature of the time used the "x" to indicate the presence of the '030 CPU as used in the Macintosh IIcx and IIvx.

Support and spare parts for the IIx were discontinued on August 31, 1998.

Source: Wikipedia

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
- - -

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: September 19, 1988
Discontinued Date: October 15, 1990
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1988.
Processor Speed: 16 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: N/A
FPU: 68882
System Bus Speed: 16 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 256k
  • The Macintosh IIx ROM is "32-bit dirty."
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: N/A
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 120 ns
  • PAL SIMMs required for 4 MB and larger capacities.
Standard RAM: 1 MB, 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 128 MB
  • With 32-bit addressing and the MODE32 system extension this model is capable of supporting 128 MB of RAM (16 MB SIMMs in all eight slots).

    Also see: Actual Max RAM of All G3 & Later Macs.
Motherboard RAM: None
RAM Slots: 8
  • RAM SIMMs must be installed in groups of four.
Video Card: Video Card
VRAM Type: Video Card
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh IIx had either 256k or 512k of VRAM and supported multiple resolutions.
Standard VRAM: 256k, 512k
Maximum VRAM: 256k, 512k
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh IIx had 256k or 512k of VRAM, but numerous third-party video cards also were available.
Display Support: Up to 6 Displays
Resolution Support: 512x384, 640x480
  • The Macintosh IIx can support multiple displays -- originally at great cost -- using multiple video cards in NuBus expansion slots. The Macintosh IIx also can support multiple resolutions, 512x384 and 640x480 are common. Portrait (vertical orientation) displays also were popular.
2nd Display Support: Dual/Mirroring
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • This model can support multiple displays with multiple video cards.
Standard Hard Drive: 40 MB, 80 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • The Macintosh IIx was offered with a 40 MB or an 80 MB internal SCSI hard drive.
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB x2 (Auto)
  • Second floppy drive optional.
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 6 NuBus
Expansion Bays: None
  • There are no free expansion bays with dual disk drives and one hard drive installed. Third-party products were available to install additional and other storage options.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh II
Apple Order No: M5280
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIx
  • M5280 refers to a configuration with 1 MB of RAM and a single 1.44 MB floppy drive. M5830 refers to a configuration with 4 MB of RAM, a 1.44 MB floppy drive, and an 80 MB hard drive with the Mac System installed and M5850 refers to the same configuration but with the A/UX operating system installed.
Apple Model No: M5840
Gestalt ID: 7
  • Also see: All Macs with the M5840 Model Number and 7 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium (x2)
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 6.0.1
Supported Mac OS: 6.0.1-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.5.5
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.4
Avg. Weight: 24.0 lbs (10.9 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (14 cm, 47.5 cm, 36.6 cm).
Original Price (US): US$7800, US$9300
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIcx

Apple Macintosh IIcx The Apple Macintosh IIcx features a 16 MHz 68030 processor, a 68882 FPU, 1 MB or 4 MB of RAM, a 40 MB or 80 MB hard drive, and the option of an Apple Macintosh II video card in a compact desktop case.

Basically, the Macintosh IIcx is a smaller version of the previously released Macintosh IIx, and as a result of its smaller size only has one 1.44 MB disk drive rather than two and three NuBus slots rather than six, but the IIcx has a simpler and delightfully easy-to-upgrade case as well. It gains a Floppy Disk Drive port, too.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIcx was introduced by Apple Computer in 1989, half a year after the introduction of the Macintosh IIx. The IIcx resembled the IIx to a great extent and provided the same performance, but was quieter (due to its quieter fan on a smaller power supply) than its predecessor. Reducing the number of NuBus slots from 6 to 3 also made the machine much more compact. The new case, Apple's first to be designed to operate in either a horizontal or vertical orientation, remained in use for its successors the IIci and Quadra 700. The idea for vertical orientation, one of the first minitower cases, was suggested by Apple CEO John Sculley, who was running out of space on his desk, despite the fact that the new layout actually took more space once the monitor was taken into account. The model was designated IIcx for compact (echoing the earlier Apple IIc compact model in the Apple II series), and the x was Apple's designation for the 68030 processor.

Users liked the Mac IIcx, in part, because its components and parts (such as the RAM, NuBus slots, and power supply) snapped into place inside the case without the need for screws. There was one central safety screw that tied the assembly together though it was often not reinstalled if ever removed. At the IIcx's introduction, Jean-Louis Gassee demonstrated the IIcx's modular design by assembling one from parts in front of the audience. This made it less expensive to build, easier to repair, and earned it heavy praise and a warm reception amongst the Mac community.

This model was superseded by the Macintosh IIci, which used the same case.

Source: Wikipedia

"Corporate" Snow White established the appearance of the Macintosh throughout the late 1980s. However, with frogdesign no longer used by Apple, the design language was adapted instead by Apple's own designers to new products. The first of such "Snow White 'skin jobs'" was by Gavin Ivester, an apprentice working at Apple while finishing an industrial design degree at San Jose State University. He was the youngest industrial designer ever to complete a shipped product (Kunkel, 61). This expresses the fallen emphasis on design at Apple during the years that products were guided by Jean-Louis Gassée, but also indicates the resilience and clarity of the Snow White language. Apple could easily follow the guidelines set by frogdesign until the use of Snow White became stale or filtered into other computer companies' products.

The Macintosh IIcx design was completed by Ivester in 1987, though the product did not ship until early 1989. The IIcx is in essence a compact version of the Macintosh II. Having only three rather than six expansion slots and room for only one floppy, it is far narrower than its predecessor (see technical specifications). It has a less formal appearanceMac IIcx than the Macintosh II, an effect generated largely by the addition of five Snow White lines between the break in the bezel where the case comes apart and the strip containing the floppy slot. The recessed base with its vertical lines are missing, replaced instead by a single line wrapping around to the back of the case, mirroring in its placement the break less than an inch from the top.

The symmetry used on the case visually reinforces its ability to rest both on its bottom and on its side. The idea for designing a computer that could be turned onto its side was suggested, not by a designer, but by CEO John Sculley, who found he needed more desk space. The IIcx came with little rubber feet that could be removed from the bottom of the case and placed on its side for this first use of a "minitower" design. Its case was used again in September 1989 for the IIci, marketed very successfully towards graphic design professionals (Kunkel, 61-2).

Source: Apple and the History of Personal Computer Design

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000126 F910BURM5675 -
H0000125 F9215SMM5675 -
H0000128 F9144KWM5665 -
H0000127 F9230EAM5665 -

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: March 7, 1989
Discontinued Date: March 11, 1991
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1989.
Processor Speed: 16 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68882
System Bus Speed: 16 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 256k
  • The Macintosh IIcx ROM is "32-bit dirty."
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: N/A
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 120 ns
  • PAL SIMMs required for 4 MB and larger capacities.
Standard RAM: 1 MB, 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 128 MB
  • With 32-bit addressing and the MODE32 system extension this model is capable of supporting 128 MB of RAM (16 MB SIMMs in all eight slots).

    Also see: Actual Max RAM of All G3 & Later Macs.
Motherboard RAM: None
RAM Slots: 8
  • RAM SIMMs must be installed in groups of four.
Video Card: Video Card
VRAM Type: Video Card
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh IIcx had either 256k or 512k of VRAM and supported multiple resolutions.
Standard VRAM: 256k, 512k
Maximum VRAM: 256k, 512k
  • The standard video card options for the Macintosh IIcx had 256k or 512k of VRAM, but numerous third-party video cards also were available.
Display Support: Up to 3 Displays
Resolution Support: 512x384, 640x480
  • The Macintosh IIcx can support multiple displays -- originally at great cost -- using multiple video cards in NuBus expansion slots. The Macintosh IIcx also can support multiple resolutions, 512x384 and 640x480 are common. Portrait (vertical orientation) displays also were popular.
2nd Display Support: Dual/Mirroring
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • This model can support multiple displays with multiple video cards.
Standard Hard Drive: 40 MB, 80 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • The Macintosh IIcx was offered with a 40 MB or an 80 MB internal SCSI hard drive.
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 3 NuBus
Expansion Bays: None
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh IIcx
Apple Order No: M5660
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIcx
  • M5660 refers to the configuration with 1 MB of RAM and a 1.44 MB floppy disk drive. Configured with 1 MB of RAM, a 1.44 MB floppy drive and a 40 MB hard drive is M5610. Configured with 4 MB of RAM, a 1.44 MB floppy drive, and an 80 MB hard drive running the Macintosh System is M5680 and the same configuration running the A/UX operating system is M5690.
Apple Model No: M5650
Gestalt ID: 8
  • Also see: All Macs with the M5650 Model Number and 8 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 6.0.3
Supported Mac OS: 6.0.3-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.5.5
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 5.5 x 11.9 x 14.4
Avg. Weight: 13.6 lbs (6.2 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (14 cm, 30.2 cm, 36.6 cm).
Original Price (US): US$5369-US$7069
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIci

Apple Macintosh IIci
The Apple Macintosh IIci features a 25 MHz 68030 processor, a 68882 FPU, 1 MB or 4 MB of RAM and commonly a 40 MB or 80 MB hard drive in a compact, delightfully easy-to-expand desktop case.

The Macintosh IIci is the first Macintosh with a "32-bit clean" ROM, as well as the first Macintosh in the Macintosh II series to feature a level 2 cache, a PDS slot, and built-in monitor support.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Apple Macintosh IIci was an improvement on the Macintosh IIcx. Sharing the same compact case design with three expansion slots, the IIci improved upon the IIcx's 16 MHz Motorola 68030 CPU and 68882 FPU, replacing them with 25 MHz versions of these chips. The IIci came with either a 40- or an 80-megabyte hard disk. A logic board upgrade was available for IIcx owners. The Quadra 700's case uses the same form factor, and a logic board upgrade was made available for both the IIcx and IIci upon the Quadra's introduction in 1991.

The IIci introduced a lot of technical and architectural enhancements, some of which were important in preparing for System 7 (which was then called the Blue project) and would influence future Macs, though some of them came at the cost of compatibility:
  • a new, 32-bit clean ROM with built-in 32-bit QuickDraw that consists of two parts: one part that is the same across all Macs, and another area (called the overpatch area) that is specific to each Mac.
  • discontiguous physical memory that is mapped into a contiguous memory area by the MMU. Some of the System 7 virtual memory functions had to be added to the ROM to support getting the physical address of the memory.
  • an optional 32KB Level 2 cache. The cache card, which fit into a special slot on the motherboard, was later included in all systems at no charge. Third-party cards offered up to 128KB, but the added cache size yielded little benefit over the base card.
  • a first for a modular Mac — onboard graphics for an external display. This freed one of the system's three NuBus slots. However, because the integrated graphics used the system's RAM for its frame buffer, some users used a NuBus graphics card to reclaim the lost memory. Also, it was popular to install faster memory in the first bank of SIMM slots, as this is the bank used by the video subsystem.
The IIci was one of the most popular and longest-lived Mac models of all time. For much of its lifespan, it was the business "workhorse" of the Macintosh line. For a short time in 1989, before the introduction of the 40 MHz Macintosh IIfx, the IIci was the fastest Mac available.

Possible upgrades include 25, 33, 40 or 50 MHz Daystar 68030 boards, a Quadra 700 motherboard, a couple of different third-party 68040 upgrades, and two PowerPC 601 upgrade cards running at either 66 MHz or 100 MHz, exclusively from Daystar Digital, which was bought by XLR8, which still holds the Daystar product logo and name for its line of products. 68030 and 68040 upgrades were also made by Sonnet, Diimo and other companies.

An easter egg exists in the IIci ROM. If the system date is set to September 20, 1989 (the machine's release date) and the ⌘ Command+⌥ Option+C+I keys are held during boot time, an image of the development team will be displayed.

The signatures of the product design team can be seen in the molded plastic of the case if one removes the motherboard.

Source: Wikipedia

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000124 F9449FB730 -
H0000123 F0087G1740 -
H0000122 F1040A1Y737 -
H0000121 F9463NV730 -
Background
What is a Mac IIci?
The Macintosh IIci. An incredibly versatile workhorse of a different era. The Mac IIci was a powerful, cutting-edge, expandable computer in a small, easily accessible case. It's based on a 25 MHz 68030 processor and includes such cutting edge (in 1989) features as a paged-memory manager, floating-point processor, 32-bit system bus and 32 bit clean ROMs. It also came with built-in video and stereo audio. It's production life-span was from September 1989 to February 1993; 3.5 years is unheard of these days. When it debuted, it's cost was between $6,000 and $8,000! Partially due to its generous expandability (for a Mac, anyway) and partially due to the large numbers of this unit made, there is a plethora of parts, add-ons and upgrades available. For complete specs, see the Apple Spec Sheet or Low End Mac.
How expandable is it?
The IIci has 3 Nubus card slots, a processor direct slot (PDS), and a ROM simm slot, as well as the usual array of Mac ports around back. The Nubus slots support serial cards, ethernet, audio, video capture and display, SCSI, laboratory instrument input/output and others. The PDS is reserved for Photoshop accelerator cards, level-2 cache, and central processor upgrades. The ability to upgrade the processor was what originally attracted me to the IIci - '030, '040 and even PowerPC processor cards are available. The ROM simm slot was never implemented (too bad). When I started looking for an inexpensive Mac that would survive the ever increasing demands of Microsoft Word versions for several years, the IIci was the bargain choice!
How does it perform these days?
Well, it's actually finally beginning to show it's age ;-). This is the oldest Mac which can run 7.6. MacOS 8 or 9 will not function on it (MacOS 8 will work with some Sonnet and Daystar accelerator cards and with a certain program). Still, running 7.5.5, it multitasks better than most Windoze boxes. I am continually amazed at how many tough jobs it can do at once. I've downloaded, unStuffed, copied and worked on graphics all at the same time. 7.5.5 is very stable except while running a web browser with Java turned on. Otherwise, it tends to run most modern programs (provided there's a 68k version), just a little, or a lot, slowly. Most games which aren't shareware are beyond it's capability.
Modern counterparts
Keeping in the same spirit of affordability and expandability, the Macintosh IIci was followed by the Centris/Quadra 650, an 040 machine, and the newer PPC 7300/7500/7600/8500. These "G2"or PCI series Macs are an incredible bargain - some are selling for little over $100 these days, and the CPU can be replaced with the most state-of-the-art PPC G4. In fact, I superceded (not replaced!) my IIci with a PPC 8500. Another atractive option is the Umax Supermac S900. It was produced during a time when Apple was licensing its hardware designs and ROMs to clone makers. The S900 has 6 PCI slots, a large tower case and several unique features. 3 PCI slots just doesn't seem like enough to some people, so 6 slot Macs are a prize (the S900 is much cheaper than similar Apple 9500/9600 machines).
Operating System
Video/Monitors
Power Supply Problems
My IIci won't start up (no chime) or My IIci starts up but then immediately turns off again.
First of all, verify that the keyboard power switch is not faulty. The easiest way to do this is to start up the computer using the power switch in the back. Make sure that the switch is not turned to the "server" position (this will restart the machine in the event that there is a power outage). The keyboard doesn't even have to be plugged in.

There is a known issue with IIci power supplies. This involves the +5 V trickle that is present even when the computer is off (but plugged in). Over time, the charge dwindles down to 0 Volts, making it impossible to start up. The usual symptoms for this problem are "clicking" sounds from the power supply, or a startup chime followed by nothing or shutdown.

There are a couple of fixes that may or may not make the power supply last:

Info-Mac Digest 13 #138 item 34 (Volume 13 & 14 are missing from all the archives I could find. If anyone has a link, please email me).
From comp.sys.mac.hardware newsgroup, Wed., 16 Dec 1998:

Subject: Re: IIci & IIx power supplies

>RE the posting:
<< Does anyone know if these 2 supplies are compatible, I need to replace the [IIc]x power supply and I may be able to get a [II]ci supply. The main problem is that the computer does not turn on.>>
Before you buy a new power supply, try this: Get ahold of a cheap "power strip" with an on/off switch. Plug the IIcx into the power strip. When the IIcx is off, leave the power strip switch in the OFF position. When you're ready to boot up, reach down and flip the power strip on. Wait a few seconds, and press the keyboard power-on button. When it's time to shut down the computer, go through the normal shutdown procedure. After the IIcx "turns itself off", reach down and flip the power strip to OFF. Try this - you may be VERY pleasantly surprised with the results...

The theory is that the +5 V charge is still there briefly when you send current to the power supply. If you can start up the Mac quickly enough, you won't need the trickle charge while it's running.

Many people have asked me if I have a schematic for the power supply - I don't. Please send me one if you have it so I may post it on this site. Jan van Gennip did send some instructions (PDF) on how he repaired an Aztec power supply - thanks Jan.

I believe there are at least two makes of power supplies for the IIci, G.E. and Aztec. Mine is a G.E. and I haven't had a problem with it since I got it 5 years ago. Luckily, power supplies for the IIci are only around $15.
We had a lightning strike and my IIci wasn't plugged into a power strip. Where is the fuse?
There is a sticker on the back of the IIci that mentions a fuse. Unfortunately, this seems to be a mistake. I don't have a fuse in my IIci and others I've spoken to report the same. If you have a fuse, please let me know (and what brand of power supply you have).

Your only recourse is to purchase a new (used) power supply.

Source: The Mac IIci Website

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: September 20, 1989
Discontinued Date: February 10, 1993
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1989.
Processor Speed: 25 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68882
System Bus Speed: 25 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 512k
  • The Macintosh IIci ROM is 32-bit clean, containing no 24-bit code.
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: 32k
  • The 32k level 2 cache was provided as a cache card on early models and soldered in place on later ones.
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 80 ns
Standard RAM: 1 MB, 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 128 MB
Motherboard RAM: None
RAM Slots: 8
  • RAM SIMMs must be installed in groups of four.
Video Card: Integrated
VRAM Type: Integrated
  • The Macintosh IIci shares system memory for video function.
Standard VRAM: 64k-320k
Maximum VRAM: 64k-320k
  • 64k-320k of the system RAM is dedicated to video function depending on resolution used.
Display Support: Single Display
Resolution Support: 512x384, 640x480
  • The onboard video is capable of supporting a single display -- 512x384 and 640x480 at 8-bit in either landscape or portrait orientation. However, the Macintosh IIci can support as many as four displays with three added NuBus video cards.
2nd Display Support: Single Display
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • The onboard video supports a single display, but this model can support multiple displays with a video card, or video cards, installed to complement the onboard video.
Standard Hard Drive: 40 MB, 80 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • The Macintosh IIci commonly was offered with a 40 MB or an 80 MB internal SCSI hard drive. It also was offered with just a 1.44 MB floppy disk drive (M5710LL/A and M5715LL/A configurations).
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 3 NuBus, Cache PDS
Expansion Bays: None
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh IIcx
Apple Order No: M5710LL/A
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIci
  • M5710LL/A refers to a configuration with 1 MB of RAM and no hard drive, as does order number M5715LL/A. M5737LL/A refers to a configuration with 4 MB of RAM and no hard drive. M5740LL/A, M5745LL/A, and M5750LL/A are additional order numbers assigned to the Macintosh IIci, all configured with 4 MB of RAM and 80 MB hard drives, but M5745LL/A had pre-installed RAM with parity support and M5750LL/A was pre-installed with A/UX rather than a version of the Mac OS (System).
Apple Model No: M5780
Gestalt ID: 11
  • Please note that these identifiers refer to more than one model.

    Also see: All Macs with the M5780 Model Number and 11 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 6.0.4
Supported Mac OS: 6.0.4-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.6.1
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 5.5 x 11.9 x 14.4
Avg. Weight: 13.6 lbs (6.2 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (14 cm, 30.2 cm, 36.6 cm).
Original Price (US): US$8798
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIfx

Apple Macintosh IIfx
The Apple Macintosh IIfx features a 40 MHz 68030 processor, a 68882 FPU, 4 MB of RAM, a 1.44 MB floppy drive or a 1.44 MB floppy drive and a 80 MB or 160 MB hard drive, and the option of an Apple Macintosh II video card in an easy-to-expand desktop case.

The Macintosh IIfx is the fastest model in the Macintosh II series partly due to then-superfast RAM that was unique to the IIfx, a level 2 cache, and advanced hardware that allowed some applications to be optimized explicitly for speed.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIfx is a model of Apple Macintosh computer, introduced in 1990 and discontinued in 1992. At introduction it cost from US $9,000 to US $12,000, depending on configuration, and it was the fastest Mac available at the time.

Dubbed "Wicked Fast" by the Product Manager, Frank Casanova – who came to Apple from Apollo Computer in Boston, Massachusetts where the Boston term "wicked" was commonly used to define anything extreme – the system ran at a clock rate of a then-impressive 40 megahertz, had 32 KB of Level 2 cache, six NuBus slots and included a number of proprietary ASICs and coprocessors designed to speed up the machine further. These required software written specifically for the IIfx to take advantage of them. The 40 MHz speed referred to the main logic board clock (the bus), the Motorola 68030 CPU, and the computer's Motorola 68882 FPU. The machine had eight RAM slots, for a maximum of 128 MB RAM, an enormous amount at the time.

The IIfx featured specialized high-speed (80 ns) RAM using 64-pin dual-ported SIMMs, at a time when all other Macintosh models used 30-pin SIMMs. The extra pins were a separate path to allow latched read and write operations. It was also possible to use parity memory modules, being the only stock 68K Macintosh to support them. (There were special versions of the Macintosh IIci that used parity 30-pin SIMMs.) The IIfx also included two special dedicated processors for floppy disk operations, sound, ADB and serial communications. These I/O chips featured a pair of embedded 6502 CPUs, meaning that this Mac also had the core of two Apple II machines inside it (albeit clocked at 10 MHz rather than the 1 MHz of the Apple II). However the machine's architecture did not expose these CPUs to developers.

The IIfx used SCSI as its hard disk interface, as had all previous Macintosh models since the Macintosh Plus. The IIfx required a special black-colored SCSI terminator for external drives, however. SCSI would remain the standard internal storage connector on the Macintosh line until Apple began transitioning to IDE with the Quadra 630's release in 1994.

The IIfx was the apex of Apple's 68030-based Macintosh II series and was replaced at the top of Apple's lineup by the Macintosh Quadra series in 1991. It was the last Apple computer released that was designed using the Snow White design language. It was the penultimate Macintosh to accommodate dual internal floppy drives; the last was the Macintosh LC.

Source: Wikipedia

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000175 - F8176UGM5030
External links

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: March 19, 1990
Discontinued Date: April 15, 1992
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1990.
Processor Speed: 40 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: N/A
FPU: 68882
System Bus Speed: 40 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 512k
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: 32k
RAM Type: 64-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 80 ns
  • Note that the Macintosh IIfx uses unique 80 ns 64-pin SIMMs that are not compatible with other Macs. Parity memory also is supported.
Standard RAM: 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 128 MB
Motherboard RAM: None
RAM Slots: 8
  • RAM SIMMs must be installed in groups of four.
Video Card: Video Card
VRAM Type: Video Card
  • Various video cards were available with varying capabilities.
Standard VRAM: Varied
Maximum VRAM: Varied
  • VRAM varies depending on video card installed.
Display Support: Up to 6 Displays
Resolution Support: 512x384, 640x480
  • The Macintosh IIfx can support multiple displays -- originally at great cost -- using multiple video cards in NuBus expansion slots. The Macintosh IIfx also can support multiple resolutions, 512x384 and 640x480 are common. Portrait (vertical orientation) displays also were popular.
2nd Display Support: Dual/Mirroring
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • This model can support multiple displays with multiple video cards.
Standard Hard Drive: 80 MB, 160 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • The Macintosh IIfx was offered with an 80 MB or an 160 MB internal SCSI hard drive, as well as with only a 1.44 MB disk drive.
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
  • By default, one 1.44 MB floppy disk was installed, but the system supports two and dual 1.44 MB floppy drives were a common configuration as well.
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 6 NuBus, IIfx PDS
Expansion Bays: None
  • There are no free expansion bays with dual disk drives and one hard drive installed. With one 1.44 MB floppy drive installed, a second bay is available for a second disk floppy drive. Third-party products were available to install additional and other storage options as well.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh II
Apple Order No: M5510LL/A
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIfx
  • M5510LL/A refers to the Macintosh IIfx configured only with a single 1.44 MB disk drive. With an 80 MB or 160 MB hard drive, the Macintosh IIfx was assigned order numbers M5515LL/A and M5520LL/A, respectively. With A/UX pre-installed, the order number is M5523LL/A and with parity RAM pre-installed, the order number is M5524LL/A. All of these configurations shipped with 4 MB of RAM.
Apple Model No: M5525
Gestalt ID: 13
  • Also see: All Macs with the M5525 Model Number and 13 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium (x2)
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 6.0.5
Supported Mac OS: 6.0.5-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.6.1
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 5.5 x 18.7 x 14.4
Avg. Weight: 24.0 lbs (10.9 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (14 cm, 47.5 cm, 36.6 cm).
Original Price (US): US$8970-US$10,970
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIsi

Apple Macintosh IIsi The Apple Macintosh IIsi features a 20 MHz 68030 processor, 2 MB or 5 MB of RAM, and a 40 MB, 80 MB, or 160 MB hard drive in a compact, easy-to-expand desktop case.

Basically, the Macintosh IIsi is a scaled-down version of the Macintosh IIci, in a smaller, sleeker case with fewer expansion options. However, the Macintosh IIsi was also the first Mac to support built-in audio recording capabilities, an option that the IIci lacks.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIsi is an Apple Macintosh model in the Macintosh II series produced from 1990 to 1993. Announced at the same time as the Macintosh LC, the IIsi was the first Macintosh to ship with built-in sound-in capabilities. The LC also had a sound-in port but did not ship until later. Introduced as a low-cost alternative to the professional desktop models, it was also popular for home use, as it offered more expandability and performance than the LC series. It had color and could drive a number of different 12"-14" Apple monitors, with a maximum screen resolution of 640×480 in eight-bit color.

The IIsi's case design is a compact three-box desktop unit used for no other Macintosh model, one of the only Macintosh models of which this is true. Positioned below the Macintosh IIci as Apple's entry-level professional model, the IIsi's price was lowered by the redesign of the motherboard substituting a different memory controller and the deletion of all but one of the expansion card slots (a single Processor Direct Slot) and removal of the level 2 cache slot.

It shipped with either a 40-MB or 80-MB internal hard disk, and a 1.44-MB floppy disk drive. The MC 68882 FPU was an optional extra, mounted on a special plug-in card. Ports included SCSI, two serial ports, an ADB port, a floppy drive port, and 3.5mm stereo headphone sound output and microphone sound input sockets.

A bridge card was available for the IIsi to convert the Processor Direct slot to a standard internal NuBus card slot, compatible with the other II-series Macintoshes. The bridge card included a math co-processor to improve floating-point performance. The NuBus card was mounted horizontally above the motherboard.

To cut costs, the IIsi's video shared the main system memory, which also had the effect of slowing down video considerably, especially as the IIsi had 1 MB of slow RAM soldered to the motherboard. David Pogue's book Macworld Macintosh Secrets observed that one could speed up video considerably if one set the disk cache size large enough to force the computer to draw video RAM from faster RAM installed in the SIMM banks.

The IIsi also suffers from sound difficulties: over time, the speaker contacts can fail, causing the sound to periodically drop out. This problem was caused by the very modular construction of the computer, where the mono loudspeaker is on a daughterboard under the main logic board, with springy contacts. Speaker vibrations led to fretting of the touching surfaces. The problem could be solved by removing the logic board and using a pencil eraser to clean the contacts of the daughterboard holding the loudspeaker. As the IIsi is the only Macintosh to use this case design, these issues were never corrected in a subsequent model. The IIsi was designed to be easily and cheaply manufactured, such that no tools were required to put one together - everything is held in place with clips or latches.

Because of its heritage as a cut-down IIci, it was a simple modification to substitute a new clock crystal to increase the system's clock rate to 25 MHz for a slight increase in performance.

Source: Wikipedia

The most similar to previous modular Macintosh designs, the Macintosh IIsi was also the most powerful, expandable and expensive of the three consumer-oriented computers introduced in October 1990 (see technical specifications). Snow White lines cover its sides and top, associating it to the performance of the other Macintosh II models. The IIsi has the recessed base of the Mac II, but its surface is unadorned; the Snow White lines appear only above it. This contributes visually to the machine's already relatively small size. The front bezel has only the strip containing the floppy slot, and this surface is further softened by its 50-inch radial curve. This curve is answered playfully by the bulging vents that arc out of the back of the machine. The front bezel also tilts backwards five degrees to face the user in what suggests a gesture of anticipation.

The backward tilt and radial curve of the IIsi front bezel allowed it to Mac IIsi from backappear closely integrated with a monitor which Apple designed to sit on top of the computer, and the IIsi case and this display were shaped together to have the same footprint. The curve and tilt of the IIsi also make it consistent with the Macintosh LC, another new computer also shaped to have a close fit with its monitor.

Source: Apple and the History of Personal Computer Design

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000129 F2112HF3C56 -
H0000130 FC2201CJC53 -

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: October 15, 1990
Discontinued Date: March 15, 1993
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1990.
Processor Speed: 20 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68882 (Optional)*
  • A variety of third-party processor upgrades and accelerators were available.

    **The optional 68882 FPU co-processor can be installed via the Apple NuBus adapter.
System Bus Speed: 20 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 512k
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: N/A
  • The Macintosh IIsi does not have a level 2 cache.
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 100 ns
Standard RAM: 2, 3, 5 MB
Maximum RAM: 65 MB
Motherboard RAM: 1 MB
RAM Slots: 4
  • 1 MB of RAM onboard. Four identical RAM SIMMs must be installed in a group.
Video Card: Integrated
VRAM Type: Integrated
  • The Macintosh IIsi shares system memory for video function.
Standard VRAM: 64k-320k
Maximum VRAM: 64k-320k
  • 64k-320k of the system RAM is dedicated to video function depending on resolution used.
Display Support: Single Display
Resolution Support: 640x480
  • Onboard video is capable of supporting a maximum resolution of 640x480. If the optional NuBus adapter card is installed, a second video card can be installed to support a second display. The NuBus adapter also provides a 68882 FPU.
2nd Display Support: Single Display
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • The onboard video supports a single display. However, if the optional NuBus adapter card is installed, a NuBus video card can be installed to support a second display. The NuBus adapter also provides a 68882 FPU.
Standard Hard Drive: 40, 80, 160 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • Offered with either a 40 MB, 80 MB, or 160 MB hard drive.
Standard Optical: None
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: PDS or NuBus
Expansion Bays: None
  • The optional Apple NuBus adapter card plugs into the PDS expansion slot and also provides an FPU.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh IIsi
Apple Order No: M0363LL/A
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIsi
  • M0363LL/A refers to the configuration with 2 MB of RAM and a 40 MB hard drive. M0364LL/A and M0364LL/B refer to the configuration with 5 MB of RAM and an 80 MB hard drive. Other configurations include M0491LL/B, which includes 3 MB of RAM and a 40 MB hard drive and M0954LL/A, which includes 5 MB of RAM and a 160 MB hard drive.
Apple Model No: M0360
Gestalt ID: 18
  • Please note that these identifiers commonly refer to multiple models.

    Also see: All Macs with the M0360 Model Number and 18 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 6.0.7
Supported Mac OS: 6.0.7-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.6.1
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 4.0 x 12.4 x 14.9
Avg. Weight: 10.0 lbs (4.5 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (10.16 cm, 31.5 cm, 37.8 cm).
Original Price (US): US$3770, US$4570
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • As a collector's item, this model may still retain value.

    Photo Credit: MacUser Magazine (Radius Advertisement).

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIvi

Apple Macintosh IIvi The underpowered Apple Macintosh IIvi features a 16 MHz 68030 processor, commonly 4 MB of RAM and either a 40 MB, 80 MB, 160 MB, or 400 MB hard drive in a high-profile desktop case.

This model was sold in South America, Europe, and Japan, but not in the United States. However, the higher speed consumer version, the Performa 600, was sold worldwide.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIvi is a short-lived model of the Macintosh II series of Macintosh computers from Apple Computer. The IIvi included either a 40, 160 or 400 MB hard drive, three NuBus slots and a PDS. The IIvi was essentially a Macintosh IIvx with a slower processor (16 MHz vs. 32 MHz) and no floating point unit. The Macintosh Performa 600 is essentially a IIvi with the IIvx's 32 MHz CPU. The IIvi was, on some benchmarks, faster than the crippled IIvx.

The Performa 600 was featured in the 1994 Disney movie Blank Check.

Source: Wikipedia

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
H0000072 SG2425ZK3B2 -

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: October 19, 1992
Discontinued Date: February 10, 1993
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1992.
Processor Speed: 16 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68882 (Optional)
System Bus Speed: 16 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 1 MB
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: None
  • The Macintosh IIvi does not have a level 2 cache.
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 80 ns
Standard RAM: 4 MB
Maximum RAM: 68 MB
Motherboard RAM: 4 MB
RAM Slots: 4
  • 4 MB of RAM onboard. Four identical RAM SIMMs must be installed in a group.
Video Card: Dedicated
VRAM Type: VRAM SIMM
  • The Macintosh IIvi has two SIMM slots for video memory that support 100 ns VRAM SIMMs.
Standard VRAM: 512k
Maximum VRAM: 1 MB
  • By default, two 256k VRAM SIMMs are installed for video memory. Both can be replaced with 512k VRAM SIMMs for 1 MB total VRAM.
Display Support: Single Display
Resolution Support: 640x480
  • With the standard 512k of VRAM, the onboard video is capable of supporting a maximum resolution of 512x384 (16-bit) or 640x480 (8-bit). With 1 MB of VRAM installed, it can support a maximum of 640x480 at 16-bit color. NuBus video cards can be installed to support additional displays, as well.
2nd Display Support: Single Display
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • The onboard memory only can support a single display. NuBus cards can be added to support additional displays, however.
Standard Hard Drive: 40, 80, 160, 400 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • Configured with a 40 MB, 80 MB, 160 MB, or 400 MB hard drive.
Standard Optical: 2X (Optional)
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
  • An internal 2X CD-ROM drive was offered as an option.
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 3 NuBus, PDS
Expansion Bays: 1 5.25"
  • If the 2X CD-ROM was not installed, the system has one open front-facing 5.25" drive bay intended for an optical drive.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh IIvx
Apple Order No: M1378J/A
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIvi
  • M1378J/A refers to the configuration with 4 MB of RAM and a floppy disk drive sold in Japan. M1354J/A refers to the configuration with 4 MB of RAM, a floppy drive, and a 160 MB hard drive, and also sold in Japan. Order numbers in other countries differed.
Apple Model No: M1350
Gestalt ID: 44
  • Please note that these identifiers commonly refer to multiple models.

    Also see: All Macs with the M1350 Model Number and 44 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 7.1
Supported Mac OS: 7.1-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.6.1
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 6.0 x 13.0 x 16.5
Avg. Weight: 25.0 lbs (11.3 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (15.2 cm, 33 cm, 41.9 cm).
Original Price (US): N/A
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • Photo Credit: Apple Computer, Inc.

Source: Apple, EveryMac

Apple Macintosh IIvx

Apple Macintosh IIvx
The Apple Macintosh IIvx features a 32 MHz 68030 processor, a 68882 FPU, 4 MB of RAM and either a 40 MB, 80 MB, or 230 MB hard drive in a high-profile desktop case.

Most notably, the Macintosh IIvx was the first Mac to accommodate an internal CD-ROM drive, and it could be configured accordingly with an optional 2X CD-ROM drive (standard on M1373LL/A configuration).

The consumer version of the Macintosh IIvx is the Performa 600.

To purchase or upgrade a vintage Mac -- and newer Macs -- see site sponsor OHS.

Source: EveryMac

The Macintosh IIvx (code name Brazil) is the last of the Macintosh II series of Macintosh computers from Apple Computer. The IIvx included either a 40, 80, 160 or 400 MB hard drive, three NuBus slots, and a Processor Direct Slot. It was the first Macintosh to have a metal case and the first case design of any personal computer to provide for an internal CD-ROM drive. An internal double-speed CD-ROM drive which used a disc caddy was available as an option from Apple.

The Mac IIvx began its life in development as a proof-of-concept to see how an internal CD-ROM drive could be added to a Mac. But after Apple CEO John Sculley gave a speech at MacWorld Tokyo which promised a Mac with a CD-ROM drive, the IIvx was rushed into production. Several shortcuts were taken in its design; most notably, its 32 MHz processor was crippled by a 16 MHz bus, making it slightly slower than the popular but aging Macintosh IIci. Its serial port was limited to 57.6 kbit/s, which could cause problems with serial connections and MIDI hardware. The Macintosh IIvi (a slower version of the IIvx with a 16MHz processor) was introduced at the same time but discontinued only four months later. The high-end member of the original Performa family, the Performa 600 was also based on the same architecture. The IIvx was the only model in the series with a 32K L2 cache.

The Macintosh IIvx has the same chassis as the Centris 650 (later known as the Quadra 650). It can be upgraded to this machine by a simple logic board swap.

The much-more-powerful Macintosh Centris 650 was released four months after the IIvx for $250 less, immediately rendering the IIvx obsolete. The IIvx's base price was slashed by over a third and it would remain on sale for another eight months. For a while afterwards, people who bought an expensive Mac that quickly became outdated were said to have been "IIvx-ed".

Source: Wikipedia

Instances
Hostname Serial Number Status Case
colour
Order
Number
Model
Number
Model
Identification
- - -
External links
  • EveryMac technical specifications
  • Apple technical specifications

Technical Specifications

Introduction Date: October 19, 1992
Discontinued Date: October 21, 1993
  • The "Introduction Date" refers to the date a model was introduced via press release. The "Discontinued Date" refers to the date a model either was replaced by a subsequent system or production otherwise ended.

    Also see: All Macs introduced in 1992.
Processor Speed: 32 MHz
Processor Type: 68030
  • This model has a 32-bit processor and a 32-bit data path.
Processor Upgrade: Third-Party
FPU: 68882
System Bus Speed: 16 MHz
Cache Bus Speed: N/A
ROM Type: Macintosh ROM
ROM Size: 1 MB
L1 Cache: 0.5k
L2 Cache: 32k
  • Unlike the even slower Macintosh IIvi, the Macintosh IIvx has a 32k level 2 cache.
RAM Type: 30-pin SIMM
Min. RAM Speed: 80 ns
Standard RAM: 4 MB, 5 MB
Maximum RAM: 68 MB
Motherboard RAM: 4 MB
RAM Slots: 4
  • 4 MB of RAM onboard. Four identical RAM SIMMs must be installed in a group.
Video Card: Dedicated
VRAM Type: VRAM SIMM
  • The Macintosh IIvx has two SIMM slots for video memory that support 100 ns VRAM SIMMs.
Standard VRAM: 512k, 1 MB
Maximum VRAM: 1 MB
  • By default, either two 256k VRAM SIMMs or two 512k VRAM SIMMs are installed for video memory. The smaller modules can be replaced with 512k VRAM SIMMs for 1 MB total VRAM in configurations where it was not pre-installed.
Display Support: Single Display
Resolution Support: 640x480
  • With the most common 512k of VRAM, the onboard video is capable of supporting a maximum resolution of 512x384 (16-bit) or 640x480 (8-bit). With 1 MB of VRAM installed, it can support a maximum of 640x480 at 16-bit color. NuBus video cards can be installed to support additional displays, as well.
2nd Display Support: Single Display
2nd Max. Resolution: Variable
  • The onboard memory only can support a single display. NuBus cards can be added to support additional displays, however.
Standard Hard Drive: 40, 80, 230 MB
Int. HD Interface: SCSI
  • Configured with a 40 MB, 80 MB, or 230 MB hard drive.
Standard Optical: 2X (Optional)
Standard Disk: 1.44 MB (Auto)
  • An internal 2X CD-ROM drive was offered as an option. Standard in M1373LL/A configuration.
Standard Modem: None
Standard Ethernet: None
Expansion Slots: 3 NuBus, PDS
Expansion Bays: 1 5.25"
  • If the 2X CD-ROM was not installed, the system has one open front-facing 5.25" drive bay intended for an optical drive.
Case Type: Desktop
Form Factor: Macintosh IIvx
Apple Order No: M1355LL/A
Apple Subfamily: Macintosh IIvx
  • M1355LL/A refers to the configuration with 4 MB of RAM, 512k of VRAM, and an 80 MB hard drive. M1371LL/A is configured with 4 MB of RAM, 512k of VRAM, and a 230 MB hard drive. M1373LL/A is configured with 5 MB of RAM, 1 MB of VRAM, an 80 MB hard drive, and a 2X CD-ROM drive.
Apple Model No: M1350
Gestalt ID: 48
  • Please note that these identifiers commonly refer to multiple models.

    Also see: All Macs with the M1350 Model Number and 48 Gestalt ID.

    For more about identifiers and how to locate them on modern Macs, please refer to EveryMac.com's Mac Identification section.
Battery Type: 3.6V Lithium
Battery Life: N/A
Original Mac OS: 7.1
Supported Mac OS: 7.1-7.5.1, 7.5.3-7.6.1
  • Earlier and later versions of the Macintosh System/Finder and Mac OS are not supported.

    For systems capable of running older versions of the Mac OS -- as well as modern ones -- please see site sponsor OHS. OHS specializes in heavily upgraded Macs capable of running both Mac OS X and Mac OS 9 applications.
Dimensions: 6.0 x 13.0 x 16.5
Avg. Weight: 25.0 lbs (11.3 kg)
  • In inches - height by width by depth, (15.2 cm, 33 cm, 41.9 cm).
Original Price (US): US$2950, US$3550
Est. Current Retail: N/A
  • Photo Credit: Apple Computer, Inc.

Source: Apple, EveryMac

External inks

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Files

Apple Macintosh II

Photographs

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Contacts: afberendsen AT gmail DOT com
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