Navigation

    Home

    Hendrik Cornelisz Vroom, The Return of the Second East Indies Company Expedition, 1599. Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam


    THE GLOBAL LOWLANDS IN THE EARLY MODERN PERIOD: 1300-1800
    A CONFERENCE ON DUTCH AND FLEMISH HISTORY AND CULTURE IN A WORLDWIDE PERSPECTIVE
    AT BROWN UNIVERSITY, APRIL 4-5, 2014

    During the early modern period the Lowlands became an entrepôt for global exchanges. They connected outwards to every part of the globe through trade, colonization, expanded knowledge, material culture, and consumption. Antwerp during the sixteenth century, and Amsterdam during the seventeenth century were the first modern cities to dominate world trade and commerce. The Lowlands attracted merchants, immigrants, and visitors while importing and redistributing a vast new array of goods and information, not only effecting the culture, art, and sciences of the Lowlands but touching the lives of many other people, from New Amsterdam and Brazil to Africa, the Indian Ocean, Southeast Asia, Japan, and elsewhere. This conference focuses on the Lowlands as an example of how globalization is affecting Renaissance and Early Modern Studies.

    Sponsored by Brown University, the Humanities Initiative at Brown, the program in Renaissance and Early Modern Studies, the Pembroke Center, the History Department, the Department of the History of Art & Architecture, the Department of Comparative Literature, and the John Carter Brown Library 


    Pre-registration required: click here.

    Click here for the program.

    Directions to the conference venue.

     

     


    Comments